Tags: Morris | Clinton | Obama | Congress

Dick Morris: Obama Won't Follow Clinton Presidency Model

By    |   Saturday, 15 Nov 2014 03:29 PM

President Barack Obama likely won't follow the lead of former President Bill Clinton when it comes to cooperating with a Congress that is controlled by an opposing party, veteran political analyst Dick Morris said Saturday.

"Obama has not given up on pushing on his radical agenda," Morris said in a "history" video posted on his website. "His announcement that he's going to ban deportations by executive order is a harbinger of that and his whole approach and jamming climate change [is] another step."

If anything, said Morris, who is a former key advisor of Clinton's, Obama's actions have nothing to do with compromise, but show him "moving further to the left," which is unfortunate for the United States.

Clinton, however, worked with an opposition Congress and was able to compromise, but not at first.

When Republicans took control of Congress in 1994, Morris said, they had an assumption that it was just a matter of time until they would get rid of Clinton, and they saw no need to negotiate with him and no need to compromise with him

Clinton had won the race with just 43 percent of the vote in 1992 because Ross Perot split the vote, Morris explained, "and they figured that was just an error and that the electorate would correct its error in 1996."

As a result, in Clinton's opening years, Republicans pushed through legislation, and for his part, Clinton was "still in the grip of the liberal Democratic advisers."

But Clinton replaced those advisors with Morris and others starting in 1994, but still Clinton was fighting with Congress.

Toward the middle of 1995, Clinton gave a speech, where he said he was not elected to produce piles of vetoes, but instead produce accomplishments and achievements, said Morris, but "unfortunately the Republicans weren't buying. They still were in the flush of their '94 victory and they insisted on passing a budget."

And when Clinton resisted, it led to a government shutdown, which Clinton won.

By 1996, Morris said, it was clear Clinton would win re-election, and that he'd triumphed over Congress.

At about that time, Robert Dole stepped down as Senate majority leader, and Trent Lott took his place.

"At that point, Trent, President Clinton and I spoke and we basically said hey look guys we're not Democrats or Republicans. We're incumbents," Morris recalled. And as incumbents, their ability to get re-elected hinged on the ability to produce and approve legislation.

As a result, "we were able to pass welfare reform and balance the federal budget for the first time in 40 years," said Morris. In addition, they were able to enact environmental reforms, make health insurance portable, and pass the Children's Health Insurance Program.

"It was one of the most productive periods in history, and based on that, Clinton and the Republican Congress were re-elected in the election of 1996," Morris said.

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President Barack Obama likely won't follow the lead of former President Bill Clinton when it comes to cooperating with a Congress that is controlled by an opposing party, veteran political analyst Dick Morris said Saturday. Obama has not given up on pushing on his radical...
Morris, Clinton, Obama, Congress
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2014-29-15
Saturday, 15 Nov 2014 03:29 PM
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