Tags: Religion | face | jesus | medical | reconstruction | forensic | data

'Face of Jesus' Forensic Image From TV Miniseries Ripped for PC Content

Image:  'Face of Jesus' Forensic Image From TV Miniseries Ripped for PC Content
 Face of Jesus image from Popular Mechanics Magazine.

By    |   Monday, 14 Dec 2015 07:59 PM

An image making the media rounds as Christmas approaches that claims to capture what Jesus Christ really looked like according to forensic data originates from a 2001 BBC television miniseries on the Life of Christ that was criticized by its own theological consultant for projecting Jesus as "a politically correct social worker."

"Do you recognise this man?" writes Britain's Independent newspaper Monday.

"He appears a world-away from western representations of Jesus Christ but using forensic data from the skulls of ancient first century Jewish men, a British anatomical artist has reimagined the face of the son of God."

The image shows a dark-skinned man with dark, curly hair.

Though it is garnering significant attention, the image is nothing new.

"This new conceptualization of Jesus is based in large part on the work of Richard Neave, a medical artist retired from the University of Manchester in England," CNN reported back in 2002 after the image served as the cover of that December's issue of Popular Mechanics magazine.

"Using archaeological and anatomical science rather than artistic interpretation makes this the most accurate likeness ever created," Jean Claude Bragard, producer of the BBC program "Son of God," told The London Times, CNN reported.

CNN noted that Bragard had used the image one year earlier for his television series.

"It isn't the face of Jesus, because we're not working with the skull of Jesus, but it is the departure point for considering what Jesus would have looked like," he is reported as saying.

The British newspaper The Telegraph reported in 2001 that the theological consultant for the miniseries took serious issue with its content.

Canon Tom Wright, the Canon Theologian of Westminster Abbey, referred to the reconstruction of Jesus' face as one of the "flaky bits" of the program, the Telegraph reports.

The paper also notes that the miniseries suggested Jesus may have been working in collusion with Judas, the apostle who betrayed him, and that "he may have been drugged on the cross to make him appear dead."

Canon Wright also criticized the program for portraying Christ as the archetype of a liberal social activist.

"There was plenty wrong with the wealthy and oppressive aristocracy [of the time], but Jesus's movement was far more than another centre-Left protest march," he said.

Yet the 14-year-old image from the miniseries is attracting renewed attention this Christmas season, with numerous press accounts appearing in recent days.

Popular Mechanics revived the image for an article this past January.

Many of the media articles on the image take particular relish in having a Christ shorn of the flowing blonde hair popular in traditional Western portrayals.

"Gone are the buttercup locks," an article on Yahoo News proclaims.

Yet medical artist Neave admitted in a 1998 interview with the BBC that when reconstructing a skull for a murder investigation "a body will sometimes have hair remains with it but it is impossible to know how the victim had his or her hair cut. "


© 2017 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

 
1Like our page
2Share
Newsfront
An image making the media rounds as Christmas approaches that claims to capture what Jesus Christ really looked like according to forensic data originates from a 2001 BBC television miniseries on the Life of Christ that was criticized by its own theological consultant for...
face, jesus, medical, reconstruction, forensic, data
494
2015-59-14
Monday, 14 Dec 2015 07:59 PM
Newsmax Inc.
 

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved