Tags: china | technology | world | innovation

Poll: 43% Say Next Great Innovation Will Come From China

By    |   Tuesday, 12 Mar 2013 01:57 PM

Americans are pessimistic about the future of the country as a world leader in technology, according to a new poll that shows 43 percent of respondents believe the next major innovation will come from China.

Only 30 percent of those polled thought the next major technological advance will come from the United States, states the survey, conducted by Zogby Analytics for TechNet, a network of tech-company CEOs.

The poll looked at a host of issues related to business and technology. Some 64 percent of the respondents said the United States faces a shortage of high-skilled workers, and 63 percent said that such workers from abroad should be allowed to stay in the country.

Among other findings from the poll:
  • 50.3 percent said the federal government is not doing enough to help the country remain a global leader in technology and innovation;
  • 74 percent want to simplify the corporate tax codes to help businesses remain competitive in the global economy;
  • 62 percent say that lower corporate tax rates will lead to more hiring;
  • 43 percent of American households have more than four mobile devices, and 6 percent have more than eight.
The survey of 1,000 likely voters, conducted March 4 and March 5, has a margin of error of plus or minus 3.2 percent.

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Americans are pessimistic about the future of the country as a world leader in technology, according to a new poll that shows 43 percent of respondents believe the next major innovation will come from China.
china,technology,world,innovation
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2013-57-12
Tuesday, 12 Mar 2013 01:57 PM
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