Tags: los angeles | traffic | highway tolls | hov

Los Angeles Eyes Pricey Highway Rope Lines

Image: Los Angeles Eyes Pricey Highway Rope Lines
Sunday traffic moves on Interstate Highway 110 at dusk through downtown of Los Angeles on March 23, 2014. (Joe Klamar/AFP/Getty Images)

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Saturday, 01 Apr 2017 08:30 AM Current | Bio | Archive

I’ve never understood why when schools suffer overcrowding — even by students who should really be in school in say, Mexico — politicians race to see who can be first to call for building new schools to meet demand and relieve overcrowding.

Yet when highways become overcrowded — possibly by cars that should be in Mexico taking the students to school — politicians almost never call for building more roads to meet demand and relieve overcrowding.

In fact, in Los Angeles County officials are essentially talking about putting up barriers to keep people off the highways by charging tolls on formerly free carpool lanes and increasing the number of passengers each carpool vehicle must carry.

The educational equivalent to this would be school boards telling parents to either home-school their children or get ready for combining different grades in the same classroom.

The Los Angeles Times quotes Metropolitan Transportation Authority Chairman John Fasana as saying he has no alternative but to punish drivers, "This is something we have no choice but to do."

Gee, what do you expect a transportation authority to do anyway? Build a road?

Other Metro bureaucrats are particularly wary of someone who only drives with one other person in the car. Is he a loner? Should he be watched? L.A. city councilman Paul Krekorian thinks Metro should study banning all cars from carpool lanes! Instead limiting them to "truly high-occupancy vehicles, like buses."

Krekorian is also skeptical about who should be counted as a passenger. It’s bad enough when someone puts a toupee on a balloon to get in the carpool lane, but what about parents with bad intent? Sounding a bit like a salesperson at Planned Parenthood, Krekorian asks should toddlers be counted as a person? "A 4–year-old child is not going to drive their own car, so it’s really achieving no benefit," Krekorian said.

When L.A. took federal money for the carpool lanes it had to guarantee an average speed of 45 mph during 90 percent of peak driving periods. The Times reports two-thirds of CA carpool lanes didn’t meet that benchmark.

In L.A. the toll lanes are currently free to carpoolers, even those scum who count Muffy as a passenger, and solo drivers are charged a flexible per-mile fee. The fee increases with congestion to discourage drivers. The problem is L.A. politicians have utterly failed to do their job and build enough roads to serve the metro area. Driving on non-toll lanes during rush hour is so painful drivers will gladly pay a maximum toll of $20.00 for a one-way trip.

There is no good choice for the average taxpayer. It’s either going to be higher tolls or more crowed cars. That’s because in L.A. County tax dollars are fine for defraying costs associated with being a Sanctuary, but those same dollars aren’t good enough for building roads.

Michael Reagan, the eldest son of President Reagan, is a Newsmax TV analyst. A syndicated columnist and author, he chairs The Reagan Legacy Foundation. Michael is an in-demand speaker with Premiere speaker’s bureau. Read more reports from Michael Reagan — Go Here Now.

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Reagan
There is no good choice for the average taxpayer. It’s either going to be higher tolls or more crowed cars. That’s because in L.A. County tax dollars are fine for defraying costs associated with being a Sanctuary, but those same dollars aren’t good enough for building roads.
los angeles, traffic, highway tolls, hov
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2017-30-01
Saturday, 01 Apr 2017 08:30 AM
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