Tags: California | Gardena | Calif. | IRS | Washington | D.C. Washington Times

Something Rotten in Gardena's Water

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Monday, 09 Feb 2015 11:49 AM Current | Bio | Archive

California residents are learning a government organization doesn’t have to be huge, remote, hostile to citizens, and impervious to reform to lose all credibility with residents. Although I will admit the IRS does set the bar pretty high.

Particularly now that the Washington Times has discovered conservatives' least favorite government agency has “rehired hundreds of employees who had prior records of bad performance at the agency, including 141 former workers who had botched their own tax returns and others who had used their positions to peek at private tax information.”

Five of these ethical retreads had intentionally failed to file a tax return within the last two years, which I was under the impression was against the law. I suppose that only applies to taxpayers who don’t work for the government.

Still when it comes to brazenly ignoring a potential threat to the public, the Golden State Water Company is certainly a government agency of IRS caliber. Golden State is the utility providing water for Gardena, Calif. I’m using both terms, provide and water, very loosely.

NBC4 Southern California reports that water in Gardena has been characterized by the odor of rotten eggs, a sewer smell or is simply a black sludge. Emy Sebastian, a resident and customer, explains, “We don’t want to drink our water, because our water is black. My daughter says, ‘Mommy the water is black and it stinks. Why does the water stink?’ She doesn’t want to wash her clothes.”

From photos posted on the website, I wouldn’t want to wash my tires much less my clothes in that tar–like substance.

Diane Morita, quoted by NBC4 Southern California, said the water “has an odor of rotten eggs or sewer smell. I’m concerned because it’s getting worse, if it’s even safe.” Unless water customers in Gardena have been changing their oil in the toilet, something is obviously wrong.

Morita contacted Golden State and was told the water is safe to drink. Still she and her neighbors aren’t touching the stuff. Reflexively defending the indefensible is the defining characteristic of unresponsive government bureaucracies. Instead of announcing that Golden State is committed to providing safe, clean, and non–smelly water and until it can investigate the problem the company will be sending a truck to deliver bottled water, the utility denied the obvious.

It’s no wonder trust for government and government institutions is at an all time low in the United States. From Washington, D.C. to Gardena, Calif., a government bureaucrat’s first priority is to cover their behinds at all costs, regardless of the cost to the public.
Until that mindset changes trust in government and government effectiveness will continue to decline.

Michael Reagan is the son of President Ronald Reagan. He is president of The Reagan Legacy Foundation and chairman of the League of American Voters. Mike is an in-demand speaker with Premiere. Read more reports from Michael Reagan — Go Here Now.
 

 



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It’s no wonder trust for government and government institutions is at an all time low in the United States. From Washington, D.C. to Gardena, Calif., a government bureaucrat’s first priority is to cover their behinds at all costs, regardless of the cost to the public.
California, Gardena, Calif., IRS, Washington, D.C. Washington Times
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2015-49-09
Monday, 09 Feb 2015 11:49 AM
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