Tags: Barack Obama | Dominos | FDA | Pizza Hut | U.S. Supreme Court

FDA Rules Weigh Heavy on Fast Food

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Tuesday, 17 Mar 2015 12:13 PM Current | Bio | Archive

The same administration that assures us its takeover of the nation’s health insurance industry is going just fine — with the exception of a few typos, Supreme Court cases and the growing pile of exemption forms — is experiencing a few difficulties with the new menu regime the Food and Drug Administration has established.

In case you missed the announcement between bites of your bacon–crust pizza with extra cheese, the Obama administration has ordered restaurant chains to display calorie information on the menu.

Like most edicts from the federal government, and particularly this administration, the rule is voluminous and poorly written. Even better, failure to comply could result in someone from the company doing jail time.

The problem is, as reporter Elizabeth Harrington of the Washington Free Beacon wrote, “Essentially we think this rule is a kind of disaster for everybody,” Lynn Liddle, executive vice president of Domino’s, said. “Not just pizza but restaurants, and anybody that’s going to fall within this law. It’s still not workable.”

Dominos had already attempted to be a corporate good citizen and has been posting calorie counts on the web for more than ten years. Customers who were interested, or simply gluttons for punishment, could go online, customize their pizza with all the toppings they prefer and then see how much larger they will have to buy their pants in the future.

Or they could decide not to have the pizza delivered and instead jog to the store themselves. But that wasn’t good enough for Nanny Sam.

Instead the feds issued a novel–sized tome of “391 pages [that] addresses details such as whether a limited-time “pumpkin spice muffin” should be covered, [but] it still does not give clear guidance about how restaurants are supposed to comply, according to critics. The rule, finalized in November, will affect chains with 20 or more stores.”

Harrington explains, “One problem, Liddle said, is that the final rule broadly expanded the definition of what qualifies as a “menu.” Under the rule “menu” can refer to any writing that “used by a customer to make an order selection at the time the customer is viewing the writing,” which could apply to advertisements.”

Even worse, customizing pizza toppings, crust, garnishes, and extra fat make the number of combinations — each requiring a calorie count — literally countless; a concept the top–down pencil pushers in the Obama administrations find impossible to grasp.

Dominos offers 34 million different pizza combinations and the larger Pizza Hut has 2 billion potential combinations. A customer could starve to death while simply reading the menu.

Estimates to comply with this edict run to $1.7 billion for the fast food industry, a sum that will be added to the price of the food but not, we hope, in a lump sum.

Liddle said Domino’s will continue to fight to stop this stupid rule, “Hope springs eternal. I still believe that somebody will listen to common sense.”

But that was before the government decided to take control of the Internet.

Michael Reagan is the son of President Ronald Reagan. He is president of The Reagan Legacy Foundation and chairman of the League of American Voters. Mike is an in-demand speaker with Premiere. Read more reports from Michael Reagan — Go Here Now.

 


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The Obama administration has ordered restaurant chains to display calorie information on the menu. Like most edicts from the federal government, and particularly this administration, the rule is voluminous and poorly written.
Barack Obama, Dominos, FDA, Pizza Hut, U.S. Supreme Court
539
2015-13-17
Tuesday, 17 Mar 2015 12:13 PM
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