Tags: Donald Trump | Voting Rights | White House | voter fraud | investigation | voter ID

WH: Trump Wants Fraud Proof, Voter ID Law Will Come Later

Image: WH: Trump Wants Fraud Proof, Voter ID Law Will Come Later

Newsmax White House correspondent John Gizzi asks his question of Press Secretary Sean Spicer on Wednesday. (EU Politics/YouTube)

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Wednesday, 25 Jan 2017 05:25 PM Current | Bio | Archive

Although the White House agrees state voter I.D. laws are successful in curbing any voter fraud, President Trump will still go ahead with his own plan to find the extent of what he thinks is widespread fraudulent voting nationwide.

That is what Press Secretary Sean Spicer told Newsmax at the regular briefing for reporters Wednesday at the White House.

Citing Rep. Todd Rokita, R.-Ind., as the father of his state's tough voter ID law when he was its secretary of state, and its record of eliminating voter fraud, we asked Spicer if the president agreed with Rokita laws such as his in all 50 states are the solution to fraudulent voting.

"I think that's one of several things what the president is looking for," Spicer told us, noting "Georgia is another great example of a state that implemented a very successful voter ID program."

But the President's top spokesman quickly added Trump's first step will be to "get this effort under way to look at the scope of the problem and maybe make some recommendations."

"Part of that is to figure out the extent of the problem," Spicer said. "In some states, what it takes to get a driver's license may be an issue. I think we have to understand where the problem exists, how deep it goes, and then suggest some remedies to it. But right now to sort of prejudge the process would sort of get in front of the need to have it."

Reached at the House Republican Retreat in Philadelphia, Rokita told Newsmax flatly, "photo ID laws are an effective cure for the problem raised by President Trump. Going after voter fraud is a difficult process because little evidence is left behind, unlike a DUI or battery, so many prosecutors tend to shy away."

Recalling his own state's voter ID, Rokita said "since Indiana implemented its first-of-its-kind photo ID law, 15 more states have adopted photo ID laws because they are a commonsense solution that gives voters confidence in the their vote. As secretary of state from 2003-2011, I campaigned statewide on this very issue and received broad electoral support from all parts of the political spectrum."

Despite obvious differences on the solution to the problem of voter fraud, Rokita said "I will continue to serve as a partner with the president to fight for the integrity of every ballot."

John Gizzi is chief political columnist and White House correspondent for Newsmax.

© 2017 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

 
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Although the White House agrees state voter I.D. laws are successful in curbing any voter fraud, President Donald Trump will still go ahead with his own plan to find the extent of what he thinks is widespread fraudulent voting nationwide.
White House, voter fraud, investigation, voter ID
406
2017-25-25
Wednesday, 25 Jan 2017 05:25 PM
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