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Late Night Comedy Still Targets Trump

Image: Late Night Comedy Still Targets Trump

Jimmy Fallon arriving at the NBCUniversal Golden Globes afterparty in Beverly Hills, Calif. on Jan. 8, 2017. (Rich Fury/AP)   

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Monday, 23 Jan 2017 10:28 AM Current | Bio | Archive

Some of Hollywood’s most notorious liberal activists appear to be hell-bent on continuing their quest to spread the hate, most notably against the nation’s new president, Donald J. Trump.

Still reeling from Trump’s victory over rival Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, some left-leaning celebrities are wildly engaging in social media diatribes and/or racing to grab the mike at public protest events.

During the primary and general election season, a number of entertainment industry lefties were dead set on the destruction of the Trump campaign, and there were countless attempts to flood the airwaves with Trump-mocking material.

Late night comedy shows were, of course, a significant part of the media messaging that sought to shape the electorate, particularly younger voters who routinely obtain political news and information from late night programming.

Interestingly, the mainstream media (MSM) have and continue to methodically lay the groundwork for late-night writers.

In a sort of perverse media ritual, a false or exaggerated story is initially disseminated by the MSM so that late night comedy shows are then able to run with it, ultimately twisting the false narrative into vicious mockery with the ill-intentioned purpose of massaging the public mind.

A prime example of societal brainwashing, which takes place when immersed in dominant news and entertainment media content, is illustrated by examining what former GOP vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin endured during the 2008 presidential election cycle and beyond.

Even though Palin did not utter the phrase, "I can see Russia from my house," it nevertheless became the quote most strongly associated with the former Alaska governor.

The truth of the matter is that the statement actually came from a "Saturday Night Live" (SNL) skit in which Tina Fey takes on the role of Palin and proceeds to "humorously" humiliate her.

More recently, SNL taunted Trump throughout the 2016 campaign season via a recurring Alec Baldwin role in which the actor portrays our current president in a highly unflattering manner.

Immediately after the inauguration of the 45th president, SNL had comedic actor Aziz Ansari delivering a monologue in which he tells the audience, "Pretty cool to know he’s [Trump] probably at home watching a brown guy make fun of him."

Ansari then spoke about racists in America who supposedly used the election as a reason to persecute people of color.

SNL writers also used entertainment fare to buttress Democratic talking points and promote a partisan meme by featuring in a skit a bare-chested Russian President Vladimir Putin. "Today many of you are scared and marching in the streets," Beck Bennett portraying Putin says. "You are worried that your country is in the hands of this unpredictable man. But it’s not. I promise that we will take care of America. It’s the most expensive thing that we’ve bought."

SNL writers additionally went after the first female campaign manager to head a winning White House campaign, Kellyanne Conway.

Kate McKinnon, who formerly portrayed Clinton, has a new recurring role in which she portrays a caricaturized version of a fame-seeking Conway. "Who says that lying’s not an art? And when they Google just a ‘K,’ my name will come up before Kanye," Mckinnon as Conway sings. The attempt at humor continues with the line, "And when the world goes up in flames, at least for now they know my name: Kellyanne Conway."

Late night broadcast and cable network hosts are pretty much uniformly left of center. "Tonight Show" host Jimmy Fallon appears to still be doing penance after being accused of "humanizing" Trump during the 2016 campaign season.

During a September appearance by Trump on Fallon’s show, the host was severely criticized by major media outlets and the social media for allowing then-candidate Trump to appear "humble" in a segment during which Fallon messes his trademark hair.

Fallon was also skewered for being too friendly in general to the man who would be president.

The three broadcast television late night hosts, Fallon, Jimmy Kimmel, and Stephen Colbert, have reacted on their respective shows in a predictable manner to the inauguration of Trump. Sinking to a new low, they have indulged in political editorializing that is not very cleverly disguised as entertainment.

This type of late night low grade humor will inevitably continue. Kimmel has already telegraphed his plans to keep jabbing at Trump, claiming that it was difficult to find things to joke about with respect to the previous president.

James Hirsen, J.D., M.A., in media psychology, is a New York Times best-selling author, media analyst, and law professor. Visit Newsmax TV Hollywood. Read more reports from James Hirsen — Click Here Now.

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Late night, low grade humor will inevitably continue. Jimmy Kimmel has already telegraphed his plans to keep jabbing at Trump, claiming that it was difficult to find things to joke about with respect to the previous president.
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2017-28-23
Monday, 23 Jan 2017 10:28 AM
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