Tags: pain | magnesium | resveratrol | inflammation

10 Supplements That Relieve Pain

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Wednesday, 06 Jan 2016 05:00 PM Current | Bio | Archive

Skeletal muscles are some of the most highly metabolic tissues in the body, second only to the brain and heart. As a result, they require coenzymes such as the B vitamins, vitamin C, and an assortment of minerals.

Excess calcium can precipitate a headache by activating trigger points and worsening glutamate excitotoxicity. Flavonoids can be of benefit, but some people are so hypoglycemic that some anti-inflammatory compounds, such as curcumin and quercetin, can make their headache worse by lowering blood sugar levels.

For this reason, those compounds should always be taken with a full meal.

Supplements containing phosphatidylcholine or choline can significantly worsen the condition by precipitating muscle spasms.

1. Curcumin.
This compound has mild hypoglycemic effects, but can heal damaged muscles, increase mitochondrial energy supply, and reduce inflammation. It is a powerful antioxidant and reduces glutamate excitotoxicity. It also lowers nitric oxide levels. Always take curcumin with a meal. You can mix curcumin powder from capsules with extra virgin olive oil or coconut oil, or you can take one of the high-absorption forms. Take 250 to 500 mg three times a day with meals.

2. Resveratrol. A flavonoid extracted from the skins of grapes, resveratrol can also be found in peanuts (which are also high in glutamate). This flavonoid reduces activation of the enzyme that produces nitric oxide (nitric oxide synthease). It can produce hypoglycemia and should be taken with a full meal at midday. The optimal dose is 200 mg to 250 mg a day.

3. R-Lipoic acid. This powerful antioxidant and anti-inflammatory reduces excitotoxicity. In high doses, it also lowers blood sugar. Several studies have shown that when taken regularly, R-Lipoic acid reduces the incidence and severity of migraine headaches. It should always be taken with a full meal.The usual dose is 100 mg twice a day with meals.

4. Riboflavin-5-phosphate. This is the metabolic form of the vitamin riboflavin. Studies have shown that when taken in large doses, riboflavin-5-phosphate reduces the incidence and severity of migraine headaches. It may do the same for trigger points. It also reduces excitotoxicity, provides energy, and reduces inflammation. The dose is 30 mg three times a day with or without meals.

5. Pyridoxal-5 phosphate. This is the metabolic form of pyridoxine (vitamin B6). It has the advantage of having far less toxicity than pyridoxine, and is used by the cells more readily.The dose is 50 mg taken three times a day with or without a meal.

6. Bacopa.
While bacopa has not been directly studied for treating trigger points or migraines, it should be a useful compound because it raises levels of the inhibitory transmitter GABA, which would reduce excitotoxicity. It also increases the brain repair substance BDNF. The dose is 200 mg twice a day with a meal.

7. Gastrodin. Like bacopa, gastrodin raises GABA levels and increases BDNF. This should reduce the activity of trigger points and the activation centers in the brain. The dose is 300 mg taken twice a day with a meal.

8. Vitamin D3. One study found that vitamin D3 could reduce the level of nitric oxide in the neural areas associated with migraine and this reduces the headache. The first step is to get a blood test to measure your vitamin D3 level. If your level is below 30 ng/mL, you should take additional vitamin D3. Take 2,000 to 5,000 IU a day and repeat your test in one month. If it is between 60 and 75 ng/mL, your vitamin D3 level is perfect.

9. Magnesium malate (slow-release).
Subclinical deficiencies of magnesium are common. Many medications — especially heart medications and birth control pills — can deplete magnesium. A diet low in vegetables will increase the likelihood of low magnesium levels. Blood tests tell little about magnesium deficiencies as it is an intracellular ion. RBC levels are more accurate. The usual dose is two capsules twice a day, but you can increase this to three capsules three times a day.

10. Iron (carbonyl). Iron deficiency will worsen myofascial pain even if anemia is not present. This is because the body stores iron and muscles use a great deal of iron. With poor iron intake, or a gradual loss of iron from bleeding, the body’s stores become depleted, leading to weakness and overactivity of trigger points. Get a blood iron panel that includes serum iron, total iron binding capacity (TIBC), ferritin, and transferrin. If your iron is low or borderline low you should supplement with iron. The dose is 50 mg of carbonyl iron a day for two months. Then repeat the blood test. If your iron is normal, then change the dose to 50 mg three times a week for four months, then stop supplementation.
 

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Dr-Blaylock
Skeletal muscles are some of the most highly metabolic tissues in the body, second only to the brain and heart.
pain, magnesium, resveratrol, inflammation
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2016-00-06
Wednesday, 06 Jan 2016 05:00 PM
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