Tags: Obesity | weight loss | surgery

Weight Loss Surgery: Is It Right for You?

By    |   Saturday, 29 Aug 2015 11:34 AM

Weight loss surgery, also called bariatric surgery, is a sometimes considered for people with severe obesity. It can help to reduce the risk of medical problems that occur in obese people, including heart disease, diabetes and other health issues.

The goal of weight loss surgery is to restrict the amount of food the stomach can hold so calories are limited, the Mayo Clinic explained. Surgeons shorten or bypass part of the small intestine, which limits the amount of calories or nutrients absorbed by the body. Weight loss is achieved because the stomach is smaller and food is forced to bypass most of the small intestine, limiting intake.

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Doctors might recommend weight loss surgery for obese adults if they have other health conditions, such as type 2 diabetes, which are aggravated or caused by obesity. Teens are only candidates for the surgery if they are extremely obese and face weight-related medical conditions, WebMD reported.

People considering weight loss surgery should prepare for lifestyle changes, including diet and regular physical activity, to maintain a healthy weight and keep the pounds off. Doctors often recommend people lose 15 to 30 pounds before surgery. Nutritionists usually discuss eating habits with people before the surgery. Doctors will monitor a person’s nutritional health following the surgery and check on the patient’s eating and exercise plan.

As with any surgery, bariatric surgery carries risks, such as blood clots or infection. Obesity increases the risk of complications, WebMD noted.

The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases outlines four main types of weight loss surgery. Adjustable gastric band surgery places a small band around the top of the stomach to reduce food intake. Gastric bypass decreases how food is absorbed with a small pouch. A duodenal switch procedure removes a large part of the stomach and re-routes food intake away from much of the small intestine. A sleeve gastrectomy removes most of the stomach to restrict food intake.

Research suggests weight loss surgery is generally effective in weight reduction, lowering the risk of heart attack and stroke, and in some cases improving the sex drive in patients, according to Medical News Today.

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Complications may arise from surgery. Patients may suffer from vitamin and mineral deficiencies and require lifelong supplementation. They must stick to a strict diet to reduce the risk of health conditions from overeating. Regular visits to the doctor are necessary following the operation to avoid medical problems.

Information on the benefits and risks is essential, so people considering weight loss surgery need to discuss their conditions and medical history thoroughly with a doctor.

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Weight loss surgery, also called bariatric surgery, is a sometimes considered for people with severe obesity. It can help to reduce the risk of medical problems that occur in obese people, including heart disease, diabetes and other health issues.
weight loss, surgery
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2015-34-29
Saturday, 29 Aug 2015 11:34 AM
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