Tags: Thyroid Disorders | thryoid | overactive | underactive | thyroid | medication

What Are the Treatments for Thyroid Problems?

By    |   Tuesday, 16 Jun 2015 10:02 AM

Treatments for thyroid disorders usually involve medication to restore the normal release of hormones from the thyroid gland. The thyroid is important for the body’s metabolism. It helps break down food ingredients for energy and assists cells and organs throughout the body with hormones.

Problems arise when the thyroid produces too little or too much of the thyroid hormones.

An underactive thyroid, called hypothyroidism, doesn’t send out enough hormones for the body’s needs. Symptoms may include fatigue, intolerance to cold, forgetfulness, weight gain, hoarse voice, or frequent menstrual periods.

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When you have symptoms of an underactive thyroid, blood tests can determine if there are adequate levels of thyroid-stimulating hormones or T4 hormones. If the levels are lower than normal, medication includes a synthetic thyroid hormone of T4.

The medication is usually taken every day. Doctors monitor your hormone levels through blood tests and may readjust your medication. Inform the doctor of any other medications you are taking as well as supplements and herbs, which can interfere with the dosage.

It’s important that you have your condition checked if you suspect symptoms are caused by an underactive thyroid. Extremely low levels of thyroid hormone can cause the body temperature to drop significantly, which can be fatal and cause unconsciousness or coma.

An overactive thyroid, called hyperthyroidism, overwhelms the body with too many hormones, resulting in symptoms such as irritability, muscle weakness, weight loss, heat sensitivity, infrequent menstrual periods, vision problems, or an enlarged thyroid gland.

Although medication generally returns the thyroid to normal hormone levels, surgery may be necessary in the case of hyperthyroidism when medication or other treatments don’t work.

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Normally, for hyperthyroidism, initial treatments are anti-thyroid medication or radioiodine treatment. With anti-thyroid medicine, symptoms may disappear in three to four weeks, according to WebMD.

Doctors administer the medication through high doses to stop the overproduction of hormones and then give the patient thyroid tablets to restore normal hormone levels. The doctor can also provide doses of the medication on a regular basis while monitoring levels until hormone production becomes normal.

If radioiodine treatment, a form of radiotherapy, doesn’t work, surgery may be recommended. A portion of tissue is removed to return levels to normal.

Thyroid problems that need medication usually need to be monitored with adjustments to medication at times. Surgical patients also need monitoring to make sure levels don’t change.

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Treatments for thyroid disorders usually involve medication to restore the normal release of hormones from the thyroid gland. The thyroid is important for the body's metabolism. It helps break down food ingredients for energy and assists cells and organs throughout the body...
thryoid, overactive, underactive, thyroid, medication
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2015-02-16
Tuesday, 16 Jun 2015 10:02 AM
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