Tags: staph | lupus | infection

Staph Infections Tied to Lupus

Friday, 10 Aug 2012 11:08 AM


Chronic exposure to staph bacteria may raise the risk of developing the inflammatory disease lupus, new Mayo Clinic research shows.
Staph, short for Staphylococcus aureus, is an infectious microbe commonly found on the skin or in the nose that can cause sometimes-serious infections.
In the Mayo study, mice exposed to even low doses of staph developed a lupus-like disease – findings the researchers said also have significant implications for people.
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Researchers who conducted the study, published online in The Journal of Immunology, said the next step is to study lupus patients to see if staph plays a similar role in humans and if treating at-risk people can prevent lupus in the first place, said Dr. Vaidehi Chowdhary, a Mayo Clinic rheumatologist.
"We think this [finding] could be an important clue to what may cause or exacerbate lupus in certain genetically predisposed patients," Chowdhary said. "Our hope is to confirm these findings in lupus patients and hopefully prevent flares."
Lupus occurs when the immune system attacks tissues and joints. There is no cure, only treatment to control symptoms. It is more common in women, African-Americans, Hispanics, Asians and people 15 to 40.
Although it has no known cause, people genetically predisposed to lupus often develop it when something in the environment triggers it, such as infections, drugs or even sunlight.
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The Mayo Clinic study was funded, in part, by the National Institutes of Health


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Chronic exposure to staph bacteria may raise the risk of developing the inflammatory disease lupus.
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2012-08-10
Friday, 10 Aug 2012 11:08 AM
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