Tags: snoring | blood | pressure

Snoring may Flag Blood Pressure Risk

Thursday, 27 Sep 2012 11:18 AM


Women who begin snoring during pregnancy are far more vulnerable to high blood pressure and preeclampsia, according to new research by the University of Michigan.
The study, published in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, found pregnancy-onset snoring was strongly linked to gestational hypertension and preeclampsia, which can pose serious health consequences for both the mother and the unborn baby.
"We found that frequent snoring was playing a role in high blood pressure problems, even after we had accounted for other known risk factors," said lead researcher Louise O'Brien, an associate professor in UM's Sleep Disorders Center. "And we already know that high blood pressure in pregnancy, particularly preeclampsia, is associated with smaller babies, higher risks of pre-term birth or babies ending up in the ICU."
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The study, believed to be the largest of its kind, involved more than 1,700 women. About 25 percent of women started snoring frequently – three to four times a week – during pregnancy, doubling the risk for high blood pressure compared to non-snoring women.
O'Brien said results suggest that up to 19 percent of hypertensive disorders during pregnancy might be addressed by treating snoring and other sleep disorders using CPAP (continuous positive airway pressure) therapy. CPAP involves a mask, worn during sleep, that uses mild air pressure to keep the airways open.
"Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy are a leading global cause of maternal and infant deaths and cost billions of dollars annually to treat," O'Brien said. "By asking pregnant women about snoring, especially in those with high blood pressure already, obstetric healthcare providers could identify women at high risk for sleep-disordered breathing and intervene during the pregnancy. This could result in better outcomes for mother and baby."
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Women who begin snoring during pregnancy are far more vulnerable to high blood pressure.
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2012-18-27
Thursday, 27 Sep 2012 11:18 AM
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