Tags: multitasking | media | mental | health

Media Multitasking Tied to Depression

Friday, 07 Dec 2012 10:20 AM


If you tend to use multiple forms of media at the same time — such as watching TV while using your laptop, tablet, or cellphone — you might want to rethink that habit. New research has, for the first time, linked media multitasking to a higher rate of anxiety and depression.
Michigan State University's Mark Becker, lead investigator on the study, said he was surprised to find a clear link between media multitasking and mental health problems, but couldn’t say what’s behind the association.
"We don't know whether the media multitasking is causing symptoms of depression and social anxiety, or if it's that people who are depressed and anxious are turning to media multitasking as a form of distraction from their problems," said Becker, an assistant professor of psychology.
SPECIAL: These 4 Things Happen Right Before a Heart Attack — Read More.
According to Becker’s study, which appears in the journal Cyberpsychology, Behavior and Social Networking, overall media use among American youth has increased 20 percent in the past decade, but the amount of time spent multitasking with media spiked 120 percent during that period.
For the study, Becker and his colleagues surveyed 319 people on their media use and mental health. Researchers assess the participants’ hours per week spent using two or more of forms of media (television, music, cellphones, text messaging, computer and video games, and web surfing). They also assessed the participants’ mental health symptoms, using traditional measures of anxiety and depression symptoms.
Becker said the findings suggest more research be done to determine whether multitasking is causing depression and anxiety (in which case recommendations could be made to alleviate the problem) or if if depressed or anxious people are turning to media multitasking (which could also serve as a warning sign of mental health issues).
"Whatever the case, it's very important information to have," Becker said. "This could have important implications for understanding how to minimize the negative impacts of increased media multitasking."
SPECIAL: These 4 Things Happen Right Before a Heart Attack — Read More.




© HealthDay

 
1Like our page
2Share
Health-Wire
Using multiple forms of media at the same time has been linked to a higher rate of anxiety and depression.
multitasking,media,mental,health
336
2012-20-07
Friday, 07 Dec 2012 10:20 AM
Newsmax Inc.
 

The information presented on this website is not intended as specific medical advice and is not a substitute for professional medical treatment or diagnosis. Read Newsmax Terms and Conditions of Service.

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved