Tags: Diabetes | magnesium | diabetes | supplements | sugar | levels

Should Diabetics Take Magnesium?

By    |   Thursday, 28 May 2015 01:04 PM



More magnesium in the diet could reduce the risk of developing diabetes, according to research, and increasing magnesium levels through supplements may also help control blood sugar levels. Diabetics should consult a doctor and develop a dietary plan to control their condition.

Magnesium is an essential nutrient. It helps to grow and maintain bones, and it works with calcium for efficient absorption into the body. The mineral also helps to regulate muscles, nerves, cells, and it is involved in hundreds of chemical reactions to make sure the body functions properly.

ALERT: Learn How Doctors Are Using Magnesium to Reverse Diabetes

A diet rich in foods containing magnesium has been linked to a decreased risk of diabetes in adults and overweight children, according to WebMD.

Foods high in fiber are a good source of magnesium. They include whole grains, green leafy vegetables, broccoli, squash, seeds and nuts. Almonds contain high amounts of magnesium. Dairy products, meats, and dark chocolate also provide magnesium.

Magnesium might also protect diabetics from the risk of heart problems. Diabetics have a higher risk of heart disease, heart attack, and stroke than the average person, the American Diabetes Association points out. Magnesium helps to unclog arteries that lead to heart disease. The mineral reduces levels of artery-blocking LDL cholesterol while raising levels of healthy HDL cholesterol, which removes excess cholesterol from the blood.

SPECIAL: Doctors Are Using Magnesium to Prevent Alzheimer's

Diabetics are also susceptible to high blood pressure, and, in some cases, magnesium can help treat the condition. Intravenous use of magnesium has been used for pregnant women who suffer from high blood pressure.

Magnesium supplements have been used by diabetics to control symptoms, according to Live Science. Studies have shown a possible link between low magnesium levels and Type 2 diabetes. Low levels of the mineral might worsen insulin resistance and trigger fluctuating blood sugar levels. According to the National Institutes of Health, diabetes could cause low levels of magnesium, which could make the condition even worse.

Dietary supplements, including magnesium, can interfere with medications, so diabetics need to monitor their intake carefully and discuss them with their health care provider.

ALERT: Doctors Are Using Magnesium to Reverse Diabetes. See How.

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More magnesium in the diet could reduce the risk of developing diabetes, according to research, and increasing magnesium levels through supplements may also help control blood sugar levels. Diabetics should consult a doctor and develop a dietary plan to control their...
magnesium, diabetes, supplements, sugar, levels
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2015-04-28
Thursday, 28 May 2015 01:04 PM
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