Tags: hoarder | abnormal | brain

Abnormalities Seen in Hoarders’ Brains

Wednesday, 08 Aug 2012 11:17 AM


Hoarders – people who obsessively collect objects they can’t discard – have markedly abnormal activity in regions of the brain tied to decision making, new research shows.
The findings, reported in the Archives of General Psychiatry, suggest hoarding disorder has biological links – like many other mental health problems – that seriously hinder suffers' ability to decide whether to keep or discard objects.
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David F. Tolin, of the Institute of Living in Hartford, Conn., and colleagues used MRI scans to monitor the brain activity of 43 hoarders as they grappled with decisions about whether to toss or hold onto possessions. They then compared the results to the brains of 31 others with obsessive-compulsive disorder and 33 other healthy individuals as they made similar decisions. The objects used in the study included junk mail and newspapers.
Researchers found hoarders exhibited abnormal activity in brain regions tied do decision making, when compared with the other two groups. They also chose to discard significantly fewer possessions than the others, the study found.
This study was funded, in part, by the National Institute of Mental Health.
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People who obsessively collect objects they can’t discard have abnormal brain activity tied to decision making.
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2012-17-08
Wednesday, 08 Aug 2012 11:17 AM
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