Tags: exercise | alzheimer | memory

Exercise Combats Alzheimer's

Monday, 02 Jul 2012 10:53 AM




Can’t remember the last time you made time for a workout? You might want to consider that a warning and a motivator. New research shows exercise can significantly reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease.
The study, led by researchers with the Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine in Japan, found regular exercise was more beneficial than dietary changes in preventing the brain disorder. The research, published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, involved laboratory mice, but researchers said the findings have significant implications for people, too.
"Based on the results in this research," said lead researcher Ayae Kinoshita, "exercise should be given priority to prevent Alzheimer's disease."
Kinoshita noted Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia, and typically results in the loss of cognitive skills. In most cases, Alzheimer's occurs after age 65, and past studies have found factors such as high-fat diets and inactivity play a role in its development.
To determine whether healthier diets and increased exercise can reduce Alzheimer’s risks, Kinoshita's research compared the effects of dietary control, increased physical activity or a combination of both on mice engineered to develop the condition.
The study found exercise was more beneficial than diet control in reducing the development of plaques in the brain associated with Alzheimer's disease and restoring memory loss. Surprisingly, Kinoshita's team found diet control plus increased activity was not significantly different or better than boosting exercise alone.

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New research shows exercise significantly cuts the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease.
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2012-53-02
Monday, 02 Jul 2012 10:53 AM
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