Tags: Arthritis | arthritis | medications | side effects

Arthritis Medication Side Effects

By    |   Thursday, 09 Jul 2015 09:56 PM

Medications often play an important part in the treatment of arthritis. But Medications have side effects, which is why arthritis patients need to continue communication with their doctors after a treatment plan has been designed.

Physical therapy, exercise, diet, and home remedies such as cold-pack applications may be involved in a treatment plan, along with medications such as pain relievers, anti-inflammatory medicine, and medications that improve the immune system, according to MedicineNet.com.

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Creams and sprays are a form of topical medications applied directly to the skin. Other over-the-counter medications include acetaminophen, which relieves arthritis pain but not inflammation, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), which treat pain and inflammation, according to Pfizer.

Simple over-the-counter aspirin, or acetylsalicylic acid, can be found with such brands as Bayer and Excedrin to relieve mild pain and fever. Side effects may include stomach pain, indigestion, heartburn, and other stomach irritations. People taking these arthritis medications can reduce complications by taking them with food or milk, according to WebMD.

Other side effects may include allergic reactions, excessive bleeding or bruising, and ringing in the ears. Aspirin should be avoided for people who suffer stomach ulcers and bleeding problems or who are scheduled for surgery.

People who have side effects with aspirin often take acetaminophen such as Tylenol, which has few side effects. However, concerns about liver damage or failure in the long term arise if acetaminophen is taken in higher doses than directed or with three or more alcoholic drinks a day.

Common side effects of NSAIDs include indigestion, heartburn, stomach cramps, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Taking NSAIDs with food or milk helps avoid these effects. Possible side effects include dizziness, drowsiness, headache, stomach ulcers and swelling of the feet.

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Patients should talk to their doctor about taking NSAIDs if they have heart disease, kidney disease, high blood pressure, asthma, or other medications to avoid interactions that may cause further damage or interfere with treatment. NSAIDs may increase the risk of heart attacks and strokes, WebMD notes.

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Medications often play an important part in the treatment of arthritis. But Medications have side effects, which is why arthritis patients need to continue communication with their doctors after a treatment plan has been designed.
arthritis, medications, side effects
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2015-56-09
Thursday, 09 Jul 2015 09:56 PM
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