Tags: vitamin E protects against cancers | gamma-tocopherals | delta-tocopherals | Cancer Prevention Research

Vitamin E Protects Against Many Cancers

Friday, 27 Apr 2012 12:17 PM

The question of whether or not vitamin E can prevent cancer is a hotly debated subject among researchers, and studies have had varying results. But scientists at the Center for Cancer Prevention Research, at Rutgers Mario School of Pharmacy, and at the Cancer Institute of New Jersey think it definitely does — just as long as it comes from your diet. So, instead of taking supplements, which they say are usually the wrong form of vitamin E and do not prevent cancer, they urge a diet rich in vitamin E.
The researchers believe that two forms of vitamin E – gamma- and delta-tocopherols – found in soybean, canola, and corn oils as well as nuts actually prevent colon, lung, breast, and prostate cancers.
“There are studies suggesting that vitamin E actually increases the risk of cancer and decreases bone density,” says Chung S. Yang, director of the center. “Our message is that the vitamin E form of gamma-tocopherols, the most abundant form of vitamin E in the American diet, and delta-tocopherols, also found in vegetable oils, are beneficial in preventing cancers while the form of vitamin E, alpha-tocopherol, the most commonly used in vitamin E supplements, has no such benefit.”
Yang and his colleagues published their findings in Cancer Prevention Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. In a commentary, they discussed animal studies done at Rutgers as well as human epidemiological studies that have examined the connection between vitamin E and cancer.
Yang says Rutgers scientists who were conducting animal studies for colon, lung, breast, and prostate cancer, found that the forms of vitamin E found in vegetable oils — gamma- and delta- tocopherols, prevent the formation and growth of cancer in animals.
“When animals are exposed to cancer-causing substances, the group that was fed these tocopherols in their diet had fewer and smaller tumors,” Yang says. “When cancer cells were injected into mice these tocopherols also slowed down the development of tumors.”
Another paper, also published in Cancer Prevention Research, found that the delta-tocopherol form of vitamin E was more effective than other forms of vitamin E in suppressing the development of colon cancer in rats.
The action of different forms of vitamin E may be the answer to why some studies find that vitamin E prevents cancer while others find it increases risk. A recent clinical trial in the United States and Canada found that alpha-tocopherol, the form of vitamin E most commonly used in vitamin E supplements, not only failed to prevent prostate cancer in healthy men, but significantly increased the risk.


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The question of whether or not vitamin E can prevent cancer is a hotly debated subject among researchers, and studies have had varying results. But scientists at the Center for Cancer Prevention Research, at Rutgers Mario School of Pharmacy, and at the Cancer Institute of New Jersey think it definit
vitamin E protects against cancers,gamma-tocopherals,delta-tocopherals,Cancer Prevention Research
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2012-17-27
Friday, 27 Apr 2012 12:17 PM
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