Tags: Obesity | pollution | obesity | POPs | obesogenic | adipocytes

Pollution Linked to Obesity: Study

By    |   Friday, 27 Feb 2015 12:16 PM


Spanish researchers have confirmed a link between environmental pollutants that accumulate in the human body and obesity — participants with more pollutants in their bodies had a higher risk of obesity. The researchers also found higher levels of  cholesterol and triglycerides, important risk factors for heart disease, in those with higher levels of pollutants.

The study, which was done at the University of Granada, analyzed pollutants called persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in the fatty tissue of almost 300 men and women. POPs can remain in the environment for many years without degrading.

"Humans are exposed to POPs mainly through diet," said lead author Juan Pedro Arrebola. "POPs accumulate gradually in body fat," he continued, and the levels in the study give an idea of an individual's accumulation over a number of years.

The scientists confirmed that the accumulated levels of several POPs in the participants were related to obesity and to serum levels of cholesterol and triglycerides, regardless of their gender, age, place of residence, or smoking habits.

"In general we found that people with higher levels of POPs were quantitatively more obese, and also showed higher levels of cholesterol and triglycerides, all of them regarded as important risk factors for cardiovascular disease," Arrebola said.

Traditionally, obesity has been blamed on high-calorie diets combined with a lack of exercise, but some scientists are challenging that theory. "We believe that the results are not just the consequence of a higher intake of food by obese people," Arrebola said. "There is evidence that human exposure to certain chemical substances called 'obesogenic' could favor the growth and proliferation of adipocytes (fat cells), and provoke therefore an increase in body fat. We suspect besides that certain environmental pollutants could also provoke alterations in cholesterol and triglycerides levels and therefore contribute to the development of cardiovascular disease."

The study was published in the journal Environmental Pollution.

© 2017 NewsmaxHealth. All rights reserved.

 
1Like our page
2Share
Health-News
Spanish researchers have confirmed a link between environmental pollutants that accumulate in the human body and obesity - participants with more pollutants in their bodies had a higher risk of obesity. The researchers also found higher levels of cholesterol and...
pollution, obesity, POPs, obesogenic, adipocytes
310
2015-16-27
Friday, 27 Feb 2015 12:16 PM
Newsmax Inc.
 

The information presented on this website is not intended as specific medical advice and is not a substitute for professional medical treatment or diagnosis. Read Newsmax Terms and Conditions of Service.

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved