Tags: fish | reduce | heart failure | prevention of heart disease

Eat Fish to Save Your Heart

Friday, 08 Jan 2010 08:56 AM


Fish has long been recognized as part of a healthy diet, and in recent decades fish has also been associated with the prevention of heart disease. Now, scientists believe it can help preserve heart function in patients who are victims of heart failure. A new study in the Journal of Food Science reports that moderate fish consumption can help reduce the risk of left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD) in patients who have suffered heart failure.

Researchers from the University of Athens in Greece focused on demographical, nutritional, lifestyle, and medical factors combined with the risk of developing left ventricular dysfunction after nonfatal heart failure. The study included nearly 1,000 patients who were hospitalized following heart problems. At the end of the study, researchers noted that eating fish one to two times per week was associated with a considerable reduction in the odds of developing LVSD. However, consuming more fish did not result in further protection.

"More research is necessary in this area, including the determination of the type of fish consumed as well as the type of the cooking method (boiling, baking, frying)," lead researcher Dr. D. Panagiotakos said in a statement.

What types of fish are best? According to the Environmental Protection Agency, avoid big fish since they tend to have higher levels of toxic mercury that can cause permanent damage to the brain and kidneys. These fish include swordfish, shark, king mackerel, and tilefish. Seafood containing the least amounts of mercury include salmon, shrimp, canned light tuna, and pollock.







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Fish has long been recognized as part of a healthy diet, and in recent decades fish has also been associated with the prevention of heart disease.
fish,reduce,heart failure,prevention of heart disease
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2010-56-08
Friday, 08 Jan 2010 08:56 AM
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