Tags: earphones | headphones | temporary deafness | myelin sheath | loud music | hearing damage

Earphones Cause Temporary Deafness

Thursday, 30 Aug 2012 06:51 AM


Like to listen to loud music on your headphones?

You might want to think twice: Researchers from the University of Leicester in the UK have found that noise from earphones can reach decibels close to the din of powerful jet engines and cause temporary deafness, reported Science Daily.

According to the University of Leicester, turning up the volume too high on one's headphones can actually damage the myelin that coats your nerve cells, causing the temporary deafness. The myelin sheath helps protect the nerves that carry sound from your ears to your brain.

The good news is that the myelin sheath can regrow if given some much-needed time away from the continuing incursions of gangsta rap or Metallica, explaining some incidences of recovery from hearing loss, researchers found.

The study found that headphones can reach upwards of 110 decibels — the American Osteopathic Association states that newer headphones can reach 120 decibels when fully cranked up. Anything higher than 110 decibels can cause hearing damage in humans.

Dangerous Decibels.org provides some examples of just how loud 110 decibels can be. Firecrackers, motorcycle noises, and gunshot blasts (from small arms) can all be between 120 and 140 decibels.

The damage from overly loud headphones is especially rough on teenagers: The American Osteopathic Association reports one in five teenagers has hearing loss, an increase from the 1980s and 1990s.

Copyright 2012 Global Post


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Thursday, 30 Aug 2012 06:51 AM
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