Tags: sleep | snoring | apnea

Snoring: More Than Just Noise

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Thursday, 02 Mar 2017 04:44 PM Current | Bio | Archive

Snoring diminishes the sleep quality of both the person snoring and their bed partner.

For the snorer, snoring is often a precursor to sleep apnea.

And even if you don’t have sleep apnea, snoring puts you at risk for atherosclerosis, high blood pressure, and other forms of cardiovascular disease. Snoring is also tied to aging and being overweight.

Robert Deeb, M.D., with the Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit led a study on the impact of snoring:

“Our study adds to the growing body of evidence suggesting that isolated snoring may not be as benign as first suspected. So instead of kicking your snoring bed partner out of the room or spending sleepless nights elbowing him or her, seek out medical treatment for the snorer.”

A sleep study can help assess the causes and severity of your snoring or your partner’s. Ask your primary care physician for guidance.
 

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Dr-Schwartz
A sleep study can help assess the causes and severity of your snoring or your partner’s. Ask your primary care physician for guidance.
sleep, snoring, apnea
154
2017-44-02
Thursday, 02 Mar 2017 04:44 PM
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