Tags: scars | sunscreen | omega-3 | Dr. Oz

6 Ways to Keep From Scarring

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Wednesday, 15 Mar 2017 04:33 PM Current | Bio | Archive

Al Capone, the notorious Chicago bootlegger, hated his nickname "Scarface," which was earned when he was slashed after insulting a thug's sister in a bar in Brooklyn.

But if he'd been alive in 2020 instead of 1920, he might never have had to deal with the disfiguring scar on his left cheek.

Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania's Perlman School of Medicine have discovered how to stimulate hair follicles to re-bloom around a wound, triggering production of fat cells instead of scar tissue.

Presto! Wound healing without any telltale after signs!

This isn't yet widely available, but it shows great promise in revolutionizing wound healing.

Until it is, the American Academy of Dermatology says that if you have a cut, abrasion or serious surgical incision, here's what you can do to minimize scarring:

1. Clean wounds well and keep them clean at all times.

2. Apply petroleum jelly to skin around wound to keep it moist and keep scar from getting too large, deep or itchy. For larger wounds, ask your doc about hydrating or silicone gel sheets.

3. Cover the wound with a bandage; change it daily, reapplying petroleum jelly.

4. If you get stitches, follow all instructions and get the stitches removed on time.

5. Always apply broad-spectrum SPF 30 sunscreen to sun-exposed wounds after healing.

6. Focus on supportive nutrition, such as lean proteins, foods rich in vitamins C and E, and omega-3 fatty acids, and an overall healthy diet that promotes healthy wound healing. If you need the nutrition boost, use supplements.

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Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania's Perlman School of Medicine have discovered how to stimulate hair follicles to re-bloom around a wound.
scars, sunscreen, omega-3, Dr. Oz
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2017-33-15
Wednesday, 15 Mar 2017 04:33 PM
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