Tags: heatstroke | sunburn | UV rays | Dr. Oz

Beware of Sun Poisoning

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Tuesday, 11 Jul 2017 04:24 PM Current | Bio | Archive

In the 2007 movie "The Heartbreak Kid," Ben Stiller plays Eddie, a 40-year-old who marries seemingly perfect Lila after dating for only six weeks. On their honeymoon, he discovers that she's impossible to live with.

At the beach, as she rubs mineral oil on herself, Eddie tells her she needs sunscreen. "The sun is really different down here," he says. "The sun is the sun, Eddie," Lila retorts.

That night Lila is a brutal shade of red.

Sun poisoning is no joke. It starts with a seemingly allergic reaction caused by extended exposure of the skin to strong UV light.

That exposure triggers blistering, hives, swelling of the face, fever and chills, nausea, headache, even confusion — and raises your risk of skin cancer.

If you have a sunburn and are also having those symptoms, get medical care immediately.

Acute sun poisoning (which may be accompanied by heatstroke) can be treated by keeping open blisters and wounds clean and covered and through light therapy (ironic) if needed and medications.

To prevent sun poisoning, use an SPF 30 sunscreen with micronized zinc oxide and limit sun exposure, especially between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m.

Also find out if any of your meds, such as certain acne drugs, antibiotics, antidepressants, heart meds, and some birth control, make your skin more sensitive to UV rays.

If you have certain conditions, such as lupus or eczema, be aware that you're at increased risk.

Always smart: Drink 8 to 24 ounces of water an hour when in temperatures greater than 84 degrees.

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Dr-Oz
To prevent sun poisoning, use an SPF 30 sunscreen with micronized zinc oxide and limit sun exposure, especially between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m.
heatstroke, sunburn, UV rays, Dr. Oz
256
2017-24-11
Tuesday, 11 Jul 2017 04:24 PM
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