Tags: exercise | Alzheimers | cardiovascular disease | Dr. Oz

How to Avoid Alzheimer's: Exercise

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Thursday, 01 Jun 2017 04:23 PM Current | Bio | Archive

The term "sticky wicket" often is used to describe a tough spot that's hard to get out of.

It's also a term from the sport of cricket, describing the field of play (the wicket) as being wet and soft, and apt to cause a slide of the ball, making it tough for the batsman (batter). Great for the bowler (pitcher), though.

Avoiding the sticky wicket of Alzheimer's disease is an obsession for many people today, and new research is showing that there are several things you can do in middle age (we'll call that 50) to minimize developing one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's — those sticky amyloid tangles.

In JAMA, researchers recently published a 24-year study of 322 men and women which found that having just one of the following risk factors for cardiovascular disease — smoking obesity, Type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, or high LDL cholesterol levels — doubles your chance of developing amyloid clumps.

Two or more risk factors tripled the risk.

So how do you buck those odds?

According to a new study in the British Journal of Sports Medicine, it's summed up in one word: exercise.

A combination of aerobic (10,000 steps a day, with interval intensity) and weight training is the most effective way to protect cognitive function if you're 50 or older. A 45-minute session five times a week produces the best results.

So if you want to bowl over your odds of developing dementia, you can opt for increased gym time, outdoor walking, or maybe even playing cricket.

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A combination of aerobic (10,000 steps a day, with interval intensity) and weight training is the most effective way to protect cognitive function if you're 50 or older.
exercise, Alzheimers, cardiovascular disease, Dr. Oz
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2017-23-01
Thursday, 01 Jun 2017 04:23 PM
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