Tags: coffee | Parkinsons | dementia | Dr. Oz

Coffee Has Big Brain Benefits

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Thursday, 03 Sep 2015 12:18 PM Current | Bio | Archive

The recent headline "Coffee Habits Impact Risk of Mild Cognitive Impairment" reminded us of a TV ad for Berlitz language school in which a German Coast Guard officer who speaks broken English replies to a mayday call.

A ship's captain is pleading for help: "We're sinking, we're sinking! Can you help us?" The young German replies, "Um ... vut are you sinking about?"

That hilarious advertisement makes it clear that when it comes to communicating important information, you have to choose your words both wisely and accurately. Just what those headline writers didn't do.

They made it sound like coffee was bad for the brain. But under specific circumstances, it's just the opposite!

The study, from the University of Bari in Italy, actually says, "Coffee, tea, or caffeine consumption may be protective against cognitive impairment and dementia." And "moderate amounts — or one to two cups per day — appear to have greater [cognitive] benefit than drinking no or very little coffee daily."

It seems the compounds in coffee have the ability to protect brain neurons from plaque (linked to dementia) and to activate and protect other neural receptors.

Plus, if you're a fast metabolizer of coffee, as 88 percent of North Americans are, it also helps to protect against Parkinson's while reducing your risk of nine cancers and Type 2 diabetes.

The study also points out that occasionally drinking a couple of cups or skipping it altogether isn't brain-friendly, but the steady enjoyment of a couple of cups a day does the trick just right.

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It seems the compounds in coffee have the ability to protect brain neurons from plaque (linked to dementia) and to activate and protect other neural receptors.
coffee, Parkinsons, dementia, Dr. Oz
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2015-18-03
Thursday, 03 Sep 2015 12:18 PM
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