Tags: asthma | corticosteroids | sepsis | Dr. Oz

Short-Term Risks of Asthma Drugs

By
Thursday, 18 May 2017 04:37 PM Current | Bio | Archive

Miguel Indurain, five-time winner of the Tour de France; Jackie Joyner-Kersee, an Olympic track star; and Jerome Bettis, a running back for the Pittsburgh Steelers were able to master their sports despite having asthma.

Around 25 million Americas also contend with the disease, and work hard to control it so that they too can stay active.

Sometimes, however, an acute flare-up happens unexpectedly. That's when folks may take oral corticosteroids (along with a rescue inhaler) to restore comfortable breathing.

These powerful drugs also are used to ease chronic joint pain and severe allergic reactions.

What are they? Lab-made chemicals that resemble the hormone cortisol, which your adrenal gland produces naturally.

They're not exactly like steroids athletes abuse in order to get pumped, but they still have potential side effects. In the long-term, they may cause bone weakening and even cataracts.

A new study has found serious risks associated with short-term use as well.

Research published in the BMJ reviewed records of more than 300,000 people, which tracked them after they took corticosteroids orally for less than a month.

The investigators found they had four times the risk of sepsis (blood infection), over three times the risk of blood clots and twice the risk of bone fracture compared with folks who didn't take oral corticosteroids.

 And this was at a relatively low dose of 20 mg daily.

So if your doc suggests a short-term corticosteroid, make sure benefits outweigh your risks; ask how to monitor for those risks; and take them for the shortest possible length of time.

© 2017 NewsmaxHealth. All rights reserved.

 
1Like our page
2Share
Dr-Oz
Research published in the BMJ reviewed records of more than 300,000 people, which tracked them after they took corticosteroids orally for less than a month.
asthma, corticosteroids, sepsis, Dr. Oz
257
2017-37-18
Thursday, 18 May 2017 04:37 PM
Newsmax Inc.
 

The information presented on this website is not intended as specific medical advice and is not a substitute for professional medical treatment or diagnosis. Read Newsmax Terms and Conditions of Service.

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved