Tags: aging | memory | stress | Dr. Oz

Age Better With Positive Thinking

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Wednesday, 06 Jan 2016 12:09 PM Current | Bio | Archive

Connie Sawyer, who is now 103, is the oldest member of the Screen Actors Guild. In a recent appearance on John Oliver's "Last Week Tonight" on HBO, she told “The Hollywood Reporter,” "I had to get to 102 not to have to audition — for once."

What can you do to stay as on-the-ball as Connie? New research indicates that cultivating a positive outlook and using the Internet to stay in touch, learn, and even exercise can make a big difference in how your 70s, 80s, 90s, and beyond play out.

One recent study from the University of Toronto discovered that "people's feelings about getting older influence their sensory and cognitive functions."

In other words, if you think aging is about falling apart, chances are you'll experience unnecessary problems with memory and hearing.

A Yale University study says an early life negative attitude about aging increases your risk for memory-impairing brain changes when you get older.

On the positive side, another study found that older people who use the Internet are more connected to friends and family, and are more engaged in learning — easing heart and brain damaging loneliness while keeping cognition sharp.

What can you do? Cultivate optimism by practicing mindful meditation (it relieves stress), doing for others (generosity fills the heart with positive emotions), and exercising regularly (it beats depression).

And if you're not Internet-savvy, sign up for a class about getting online. Then dive into email; read up on your favorite topics; and download a strength-building video to follow 2 or 3 days a week.
 

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Dr-Oz
One recent study from the University of Toronto discovered that "people's feelings about getting older influence their sensory and cognitive functions."
aging, memory, stress, Dr. Oz
257
2016-09-06
Wednesday, 06 Jan 2016 12:09 PM
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