Peter Hibberd, M.D., is a doctor whose advice is based on more than 28 years of hospital outpatient and inpatient experience. He is an experienced emergency medicine physician, surgeon, and consultant. Dr. Hibberd is certified by the American Board of Emergency Medicine. He is also a fellow and active member of the American Academy of Family Physicians, an active member of the American College of Emergency Physicians, and a member and fellow of the American Academy of Emergency Medicine. Dr. Hibberd has earned numerous national and international professional certifications, memberships, and awards.
Tags: Supplements

What Supplements Do I Need?

By    |   Monday, 07 Jun 2010 11:43 AM


Question: What supplements do you think an 80-year-old woman needs?

Dr. Hibberd's Answer:
Most supplements are unnecessary. For most people, a well-rounded diet high in fiber and low in fat and excess carbohydrate with fresh fruit and vegetables, limited red meat products, and a generous amount of dairy and fish will eliminate the need for large numbers of extra supplements.
A simple multivitamin daily with folic acid, calcium, fish oil rich in DHA, and possibly CoQ10 supplementation (depending on your medications) are most commonly recommended at your age.
Iron should not be necessary since you no longer have the blood loss associated with menstruation. Some older patients have difficulty absorbing B vitamins, but evaluation for B vitamin deficiency, especially B12 and folic acid, is simple, inexpensive and easy to check.
Remember that sunlight is essential for our bodies to produce vitamin D necessary for correct calcium deposition. You may need further supplementation if you have little sun, especially in the wintertime in northern climates.
Omega 3 fatty acid supplements are heart-healthy, but instead of supplements, consider increasing your ocean fish intake.
Many women your age have a diet relatively deficient in calcium, and will benefit by calcium supplementation, usually 1000 to 1,500 mg daily, to help strengthen bones. See your physician for a nutrition and vitamin assessment, and set up a preventive health agenda customized to your individual needs.
Remember that certain foods and medications can become vitamin thieves, and sometimes require supplementation. This is very common with alcoholics, who are often additionally depleted in thiamine, pyridoxine, and the B vitamins.


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Dr-Hibberd
For most people, a well-rounded diet high in fiber and low in fat and excess carbohydrate with fresh fruit and vegetables, limited red meat products, and a generous amount of dairy and fish will eliminate the need for large numbers of extra supplements.
Supplements
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2010-43-07
Monday, 07 Jun 2010 11:43 AM
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