Peter Hibberd, M.D., is a doctor whose advice is based on more than 28 years of hospital outpatient and inpatient experience. He is an experienced emergency medicine physician, surgeon, and consultant. Dr. Hibberd is certified by the American Board of Emergency Medicine. He is also a fellow and active member of the American Academy of Family Physicians, an active member of the American College of Emergency Physicians, and a member and fellow of the American Academy of Emergency Medicine. Dr. Hibberd has earned numerous national and international professional certifications, memberships, and awards.
Tags: blood | clot | risk

Am I at Risk For Blood Clots?

Wednesday, 05 Dec 2012 05:10 PM


Question: I was diagnosed with deep vein thrombosis in my thigh a month ago and was given the blood thinner warfarin. I’ve been told that I can return to normal activities, but I’m worried about the clot breaking off and causing problems. Is this a risk?

Dr. Hibberd’s answer:

As long as a clot exists in a deep vein, there is always a chance pieces can dislodge and pass to your lungs. After four weeks on Coumadin (also known as warfarin), this is not likely for you as long as the predisposing risks for DVT have been addressed and corrected. The Coumadin is provided to you to reduce the risk of a clot and pulmonary embolism. Once the clot has been there for four weeks, it has hopefully consolidated, is in the process of undergoing recanalization and is hopefully not likely to propagate.

Your activity level, of course, depends upon the severity and location of your clot. You will need to ask your personal physician. Most patients are able to return to normal activities with few restrictions four weeks after a DVT diagnosis. High-risk patients and those for whom clot recurrence is judged to be very high may be good candidates for placement of an IVC (inferior vena cava) filter that is used to "catch" a clot before it reaches the lung.





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Wednesday, 05 Dec 2012 05:10 PM
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