Peter Hibberd, M.D., is a doctor whose advice is based on more than 28 years of hospital outpatient and inpatient experience. He is an experienced emergency medicine physician, surgeon, and consultant. Dr. Hibberd is certified by the American Board of Emergency Medicine. He is also a fellow and active member of the American Academy of Family Physicians, an active member of the American College of Emergency Physicians, and a member and fellow of the American Academy of Emergency Medicine. Dr. Hibberd has earned numerous national and international professional certifications, memberships, and awards.
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Is There Help for Aspirin-Sensitive Asthma?

Monday, 07 Jun 2010 11:25 AM


Question: After being diagnosed with aspirin-sensitive asthma, my lung function has steadily improved. Last year they almost decided that I didn't really need my Advair inhaler anymore, but still prescribed it along with nasal washes daily, Flonase spray, and 10-mg Singulair. My aspirin dose is down to one full-strength a day to maintain desensitization. Do you think I can stop the Advair and Singulair on my own? I am now 55 and in generally good health.

Dr. Hibberd's Answer:
Asthma is a reactive airway disease that requires disease modification to deal with inflammation of the airways. It is the inflammation that sets you up for obstructive symptoms and wheezing.
I am surprised to see aspirin used in an aspirin-sensitive asthmatic. It is more usual to avoid asthma precipitants such as aspirin. Only your attending physician can determine your need for Singulair and Advair. This is usually screened for by recurrent peak flow measurements and usually full pulmonary function studies done with and without bronchodilator.
This question cannot be answered without these studies, and it would appear that you still would be at risk for recurrence, especially when using aspirin.

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Dr-Hibberd
Asthma is a reactive airway disease that requires disease modification to deal with inflammation of the airways. It is the inflammation that sets you up for obstructive symptoms and wheezing.
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2010-25-07
Monday, 07 Jun 2010 11:25 AM
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