Dr. Chauncey W. Crandall, author of Dr. Crandall’s Heart Health Report newsletter, is chief of the Cardiac Transplant Program at the world-renowned Palm Beach Cardiovascular Clinic in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. He practices interventional, vascular, and transplant cardiology. Dr. Crandall received his post-graduate training at Yale University School of Medicine, where he also completed three years of research in the Cardiovascular Surgery Division. Dr. Crandall regularly lectures nationally and internationally on preventive cardiology, cardiology healthcare of the elderly, healing, interventional cardiology, and heart transplants. Known as the “Christian physician,” Dr. Crandall has been heralded for his values and message of hope to all his heart patients.

Tags: disrupted sleep and heart disease | importance of sleep on heart health | Dr. Chauncey Crandall

Sleep: Good for Your Heart

Wednesday, 16 May 2012 10:11 AM

According to a new study published in the journal Science Translational Medicine, disrupted sleep patterns, such as those that occur during shift work, increase the risk of obesity, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes, three conditions that are major contributors to heart disease.

The study was designed to simulate not only patterns of sleep deprivation, but also the irregular patterns of sleep that occur for people who do shift work — an employment practice designed to make use of or provide service during all 24 hours of the day.

Researchers put 21 healthy, well-rested men and women in a sleep lab where conditions caused them to become sleep-deprived for three weeks. After three weeks, the subjects were allowed to catch up on their sleep over nine nights.

During that three-week period, the researchers found the subjects burned fewer calories while at rest than they did when they had adequate sleep. Their pancreases also produced less insulin than normal, resulting in higher blood sugar levels. Happily, the condition reversed when the subjects were able to catch up on their sleep.

Everyone has to make sleep a priority, even if you are working odd hours. If you must work the third shift, make sure that you get enough sleep during the day, and that your family and your friends respect this need.

© HealthDay

 
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Research shows that disrupted sleep patterns, such as those that occur during shift work, increase the risk of obesity, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes, three conditions that are major contributors to heart disease.
disrupted sleep and heart disease,importance of sleep on heart health,Dr. Chauncey Crandall
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2012-11-16
Wednesday, 16 May 2012 10:11 AM
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