Dr. Russell Blaylock, author of The Blaylock Wellness Report newsletter, is a nationally recognized board-certified neurosurgeon, health practitioner, author, and lecturer. He attended the Louisiana State University School of Medicine and completed his internship and neurological residency at the Medical University of South Carolina. For 26 years, practiced neurosurgery in addition to having a nutritional practice. He recently retired from his neurosurgical duties to devote his full attention to nutritional research. Dr. Blaylock has authored four books, Excitotoxins: The Taste That Kills, Health and Nutrition Secrets That Can Save Your Life, Natural Strategies for Cancer Patients, and his most recent work, Cellular and Molecular Biology of Autism Spectrum Disorders. Find out what others are saying about Dr. Blaylock by clicking here.
Tags: Up Vitamin D3 for Your Brain

Up Vitamin D3 for Your Brain

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Thursday, 23 Jun 2011 10:11 AM Current | Bio | Archive

Recently, researchers have discovered that many people, even young people, are significantly deficient in vitamin D. Why? Because the recommended daily allowance is far too low, and people have been avoiding sun exposure based on recommendations from dermatology experts and government agencies.

Vitamin D3 (the functional form) is, in truth, a neurohormone rather than a vitamin, meaning it has special effects on brain function. Deficiencies can cause mood disorders such as depression and anxiety. A number of studies have shown that low vitamin D3 levels increase one’s risk of major depression, which is especially prevalent among the elderly.

Higher vitamin D3 intake also lowers risk of infections, which would reduce the incidence of brain inflammation. When the brain is inflamed, the cells that control inflammation (microglia) become activated and secrete massive amounts of two powerful excitotoxins — glutamate and quinolinic acid.

This results in a low-grade, smoldering inflammation that can last for decades. Evidence now shows that many behavioral disorders — such as depression, anxiety, panic attacks, obsessive-compulsive disorder, suicide risk, and even criminal behavior — can be traced to chronic brain inflammation.

(For more information on ways to treat anxiety, read my report "Anxiety, Panic Disorder & Migraines: Fight Back Using Nature’s Elixier’s.")



To determine how much vitamin D3 you need, get a vitamin D3 blood-level test. Many medical labs are listing 30 ng/ml to 50 ng/ml as the normal value — this is wrong. For optimum health, D3 blood level should be between 70 ng/ml and 100 ng/ml.

Should your vitamin D3 level fall below 40 ng/ml, you’ll require a dose of over 2,000 IU (international units) per day to bring it up to normal. More severe deficiencies require 5,000 IU to as much as 10,000 IU a day to return values to optimal levels.
To learn more about this amazing vitamin, read my special report "Vitamin D's Hidden Role in Your Health."



For more of Dr. Blaylock’s weekly tips, go here to view the archive.


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Recently, researchers have discovered that many people, even young people, are significantly deficient in vitamin D. Why? Because the recommended daily allowance is far too low, and people have been avoiding sun exposure based on recommendations from dermatology experts and...
Up Vitamin D3 for Your Brain
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2011-11-23
Thursday, 23 Jun 2011 10:11 AM
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