Dr. Russell Blaylock, author of The Blaylock Wellness Report newsletter, is a nationally recognized board-certified neurosurgeon, health practitioner, author, and lecturer. He attended the Louisiana State University School of Medicine and completed his internship and neurological residency at the Medical University of South Carolina. For 26 years, practiced neurosurgery in addition to having a nutritional practice. He recently retired from his neurosurgical duties to devote his full attention to nutritional research. Dr. Blaylock has authored four books, Excitotoxins: The Taste That Kills, Health and Nutrition Secrets That Can Save Your Life, Natural Strategies for Cancer Patients, and his most recent work, Cellular and Molecular Biology of Autism Spectrum Disorders. Find out what others are saying about Dr. Blaylock by clicking here.
Tags: Keep Iron Levels in Check

Keep Iron Levels in Check

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Thursday, 12 May 2011 05:01 PM Current | Bio | Archive


Are you age 20 or older with a diet high in red meats? Is your diet also low in vegetables? If you answered yes to these questions, then chances are good that your body has an iron overload.

An iron overload causes inflammation in the body, and excess iron plays a role in cardiovascular disease and neurodegenerative diseases. When iron levels are too high, they can precipitate rapid aging of tissues and bring on disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and ALS. High iron levels can also cause heart failure, stimulate atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries, which can lead to a heart attack or stroke), trigger diabetes, and increase cancer risk.

While it is true that iron is absolutely essential to life and health, only small amounts are needed. When too much iron is present, it becomes a very toxic compound, damaging cells and tissues. (You can take steps to keep dangerous foods from your diet by reading my special report "How to Avoid Poisonous Foods.")

Based on a number of studies that I have researched, my recommendation is that people should keep their iron levels just slightly below the middle of the so-called “normal” range. For adult men the approximate range is 75 to 175 mcg/dl; for adult women, 65 to 165 mcg/dl. In my opinion, anything above those levels is too high.

To evaluate your levels, get your doctor to do a complete iron panel, which will measure free iron levels, transferrin levels, transferrin saturation, and ferritin levels. (Transferrin is a carrier protein for iron; ferritin is a protective protein that shields the inside of cells from the dangerous free radicals produced by free iron.)

People at high risk for iron overload include:

• Men over age 20 who consume diets high in red meats and low in vegetables

• Premenopausal women who have had a hysterectomy, especially if they consume diets high in red meats

• Postmenopausal women on diets high in red meats and low in vegetables

• Those who have inherited genes for hemochromatosis (About 1 percent of the population has this disorder in which too much iron builds up in the body, resulting in abdominal pain, fatigue, darkening of the skin, weight loss, and other problems.)

Reach Your Optimum Iron Level
In the past, it was thought that the only way to lower iron levels was to donate blood on a regular basis. In fact, that will work. However, it is very inconvenient. Today, there is an extract of rice and wheat bran fiber, called phytic acid or inositol hexaphosphate (IP6), that has not only been shown to remove iron from tissues, but also completely inhibits iron’s ability to do damage. It can be purchased as a supplement without a prescription under the brand name IP6 Gold Powder With Stevia.

What’s more, the product — which was developed by Dr. A.K.M. Shamsuddin of the University of Maryland — has been shown to inhibit the growth of several types of cancer, mostly by depriving the cancer cells of iron. It also enhances immune cells that kill cancer cells.

To remove excess iron, take IP6 on an empty stomach twice a day. This allows it to enter cells where it can bind with the iron and remove it from the body.

However, you must be careful to not remove too much iron. After taking the product for one week, have your iron and ferritin levels checked by your doctor. If the iron levels are still high, take the product for an additional two weeks and repeat the test. Continue until your iron levels are acceptable.

Once they’re at an acceptable level, stop taking the IP6 and have your iron, transferrin, and ferritin levels checked on a yearly basis to make sure they are at an optimal level.

You can learn even more about the benefits of supplements by reading my special report "Key Vitamins That Save Your Heart, Prevent Cancer and Keep You Living Long."



For more of Dr. Blaylock’s weekly tips, go here to view the archive.




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Are you age 20 or older with a diet high in red meats? Is your diet also low in vegetables? If you answered yes to these questions, then chances are good that your body has an iron overload. An iron overload causes inflammation in the body, and excess iron plays a role in...
Keep Iron Levels in Check
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2011-01-12
Thursday, 12 May 2011 05:01 PM
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