Dr. Russell Blaylock, author of The Blaylock Wellness Report newsletter, is a nationally recognized board-certified neurosurgeon, health practitioner, author, and lecturer. He attended the Louisiana State University School of Medicine and completed his internship and neurological residency at the Medical University of South Carolina. For 26 years, practiced neurosurgery in addition to having a nutritional practice. He recently retired from his neurosurgical duties to devote his full attention to nutritional research. Dr. Blaylock has authored four books, Excitotoxins: The Taste That Kills, Health and Nutrition Secrets That Can Save Your Life, Natural Strategies for Cancer Patients, and his most recent work, Cellular and Molecular Biology of Autism Spectrum Disorders. Find out what others are saying about Dr. Blaylock by clicking here.
Tags: Fats Affect Depression

Fats Affect Depression

By
Thursday, 27 Jan 2011 09:38 AM Current | Bio | Archive

There is a strong correlation between the intake of certain fats and depression, anxiety, and suicide risk.

Studies have shown that high intake of omega-6 oils (corn, safflower, sunflower, peanut, canola, and soybean oils) increases the risks of major depression because it increases inflammation in the brain.

On the other hand, omega-3 oils — especially their DHA (fatty acid) component — have been associated with reductions in depression, particularly in the orbitofrontal cortex. Low DHA levels in this brain area are also associated with bipolar disorder.

There is evidence that the medications used to treat bipolar disorders may work by altering the effects of DHA on the brain. Lithium, one of the most effective treatments for bipolar mania, improves DHA effectiveness.

Another study found that diets high in omega-6 oils and low in omega-3 oils (the typical American diet of processed foods) were associated with depression and neurotic behavior. To learn more about how stress affects your brain health, read my report Want to Stop Your Brain from Shrinking, Starting Right Now?

A separate study found that college students under stress who were also low in omega-3 intake had greater stress-induced elevations in inflammatory cytokines than students with higher DHA levels. This stress-related increase in brain inflammation gets much worse as we age, meaning that higher DHA intake is vital for brain protection.

Populations such as the Japanese, Koreans, and Norwegians, who eat a diet high in omega-3 fatty acids, show much lower rates of depression, bipolar disorder, and suicide risk.

What all this means is that you should avoid processed foods and take high-quality DHA supplements daily. The average adult should get around 1,000 mg of omega-3 oils a day. A high-DHA, low-EPA (fatty acid) supplement is best. Children under age 14 can take 200 mg a day; pregnant women can take around 1,000 mg a day.
To learn more about the benefits of omega-3, read my report You Don't Eat Enough Fat.
For more of Dr. Blaylock’s weekly tips, go here to view the archive.



© 2017 NewsmaxHealth. All rights reserved.

 
1Like our page
2Share
Dr-Blaylock
There is a strong correlation between the intake of certain fats and depression, anxiety, and suicide risk. Studies have shown that high intake of omega-6 oils (corn, safflower, sunflower, peanut, canola, and soybean oils) increases the risks of major depression because it...
Fats Affect Depression
337
2011-38-27
Thursday, 27 Jan 2011 09:38 AM
Newsmax Inc.
 

The information presented on this website is not intended as specific medical advice and is not a substitute for professional medical treatment or diagnosis. Read Newsmax Terms and Conditions of Service.

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved