Dr. Russell Blaylock, author of The Blaylock Wellness Report newsletter, is a nationally recognized board-certified neurosurgeon, health practitioner, author, and lecturer. He attended the Louisiana State University School of Medicine and completed his internship and neurological residency at the Medical University of South Carolina. For 26 years, practiced neurosurgery in addition to having a nutritional practice. He recently retired from his neurosurgical duties to devote his full attention to nutritional research. Dr. Blaylock has authored four books, Excitotoxins: The Taste That Kills, Health and Nutrition Secrets That Can Save Your Life, Natural Strategies for Cancer Patients, and his most recent work, Cellular and Molecular Biology of Autism Spectrum Disorders. Find out what others are saying about Dr. Blaylock by clicking here.
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The Secret of Statin Drugs

Thursday, 15 Nov 2012 03:36 PM

During most of my neurosurgical practice of 24 years, I believed in traditional medicine and prescribed prescription drugs. But as I began to study on my own, I discovered that, like most of my colleagues today, I was being misled. I was parroting a line that was not true.
For instance, there is no link between cholesterol levels, saturated fats, and heart disease. But despite persuasive evidence to the contrary, most people, including doctors, are convinced that heart disease and stroke result from a diet high in cholesterol and saturated fats. For decades they have advocated low-fat, so-called heart-healthy diets.
Few are aware that despite a massive use of statin cholesterol-lowering drugs, such as Zocor and Lipitor over the past two decades, the incidence of cardiovascular disease hasn’t budged. Even in the studies cited most often by the press, reductions in heart attack rates, and especially deaths are quite small — often only a fraction of a percentage point!
For example, the Multiple Risk Factor Intervention Trial (MRFIT) study found a miniscule 0.4 percent reduction in risk in those who followed a strict, low-cholesterol diet. Such a small improvement would not seem worth the effort for many individuals. So, clever statisticians multiplied the percentage over the entire population to make the figure more impressive. The result was oft-quoted statements such as, “We could prevent 43,000 deaths if people followed a low cholesterol diet.” (For the latest information on natural methods that really work to protect your heart, see my report "New Heart Revelations.")
Four separate studies found that if you have multiple risk factors for cardiovascular disease and followed a low cholesterol diet consistently until your death, your lifespan would be increased by only three days to a maximum of three months.
Not very impressive.
Much the same can be said of statin drugs. The drug companies state in bold type in magazine and newspaper ads that their statin drug lowers heart attack risk by 36 percent. Check the fine print. There it becomes clear that risk falls just 1 percent.
If they proclaimed that their expensive, dangerous drug only lowered your risk by a single percentage point, you would turn it down. In fact, simply taking vitamins C and E will reduce risk by a much greater percentage.
Other supplements combined with a proper diet and exercise dramatically lower your risk — no drugs needed. My special report "Key Vitamins that Save Your Heart, Prevent Cancer and Keep You Living Long"will give you all the details of how supplements can improve your health.
For more of Dr. Blaylock’s weekly tips, go here to view the archive.

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