Tags:

Are Toxins Making You Fat?

Tuesday, 24 Jan 2012 07:14 AM


If you’re having trouble losing weight or find your waistline expanding, even though you honestly don’t think you’re eating more, toxins could be the culprit. Unless you live in a pristine bubble, you eat and drink them every day. However, you can considerably cut down the amount of toxins you consume.

Researchers working independently in various universities around the United States and in Spain and Belgium have found that when a fetus is exposed to toxins, it is much more likely to develop into an obese infant. Among adults, studies have shown that people with higher levels of common toxins in their bodies are more likely to be overweight.

In the case of a fetus, toxins trigger development of above-normal numbers of fat cells. In infancy and beyond, extra fat cells increase appetite and cause a greater percentage of calories to be stored as fat, leading to obese infants who are likely to become obese as adults, or at least struggle with their weight.

No one knows whether exposure to toxins triggers growth of additional fat cells in adults. However, toxins do disrupt the workings of the human body, by mimicking hormones or interfering with their normal production and function. Increased appetite, above-normal fat storage and a less efficient metabolism are results, making weight-loss all but impossible.

Solving the Problem
Between 50 percent and 60 percent of our toxins come from food, and another 10 percent to 20 percent come from beverages, according to Paula Baillie-Hamilton, M.D., a researcher at the University of Stirling in Scotland and a pioneer in studying the toxin-weight connection.

In 2002, Baillie-Hamilton began publishing results of her work with people who lost weight simply by eliminating toxic foods and beverages from their diets. They didn’t change the types of food they ate or try to restrict quantities, but chose organic, pesticide-free, or hormone-free versions. Their bodies seemed to recover a natural ability to balance appetite with physical need, spontaneously producing gradual, lasting weight loss.

Sound too good to be true? Perhaps, if you think the strategy requires no effort, but there’s the catch. Today, in the United States, it takes a bit of work to stick with a diet that’s low in pesticides and artificial hormones.

Where Toxins Lurk
If you consumed only organic food and beverages, you would drastically reduce your toxic load. While that is possible to do, the thought is probably daunting. For a more practical approach, aim to eliminate the chief sources of pesticides and artificial hormones from your diet:

• If you drink milk, always choose organic or hormone-free. It’s easy to find.
• Buy organic butter. It costs significantly more than regular butter but there’s no way of getting around the fact that toxins concentrate in the fat of an animal, and butter is pure animal fat. Health food stores sometimes charge less than regular supermarkets, and some discount stores carry organic butter.
• Choose beef and poultry raised without hormones; the package should specifically state this is how the animal was raised. “Natural” can have different meanings so look for more details. The extra cost is slight and the benefit is well worth it. Regular pork doesn’t contain hormones.
• Organic meats and poultry, or grass-fed in the case of beef, are even better choices but aren’t always available and have higher price tags.
• If you must eat regular meat, choose very lean cuts, as toxins are concentrated in the fat.
• Farm-raised salmon can be high in toxins and unhealthy fats. Wild salmon is a much better choice. However, if you can’t find or can’t afford the wild kind, Baillie-Hamilton recommends eating high-fiber foods, such as beans, with the farmed version, to reduce absorption of toxins.
• Reduce pesticides by buying organic or pesticide-free versions of fruits you wouldn’t or couldn’t peel, such as apples, pears, peaches, grapes, and berries.
• Buy regular versions of fruits that must be peeled, such as bananas, mangoes, and pineapples.
• For vegetables, choose organic or pesticide-free versions of bell peppers, celery, kale, lettuce, and carrots, as these are generally highest in pesticides.
• If you drink soda, switch to an organic one that is low in calories.
• Nuts are protected by shells so it’s not worth spending extra dollars for organic ones.
• If you eat dried fruit, such as raisins, choose organic ones.

Baillie-Hamilton also recommends taking a fiber supplement, such as psyllium seed husks or fruit pectin, because some of the toxins bind with the fiber and get eliminated rather than staying in your system. She lays out a complete plan in her books, “The Body Restoration Plan and Toxic Overload.”


© HealthDay

1Like our page
2Share
Diet-And-Fitness
If you’re having trouble losing weight or find your waistline expanding, even though you honestly don’t think you’re eating more, toxins could be the culprit. Unless you live in a pristine bubble, you eat and drink them every day. However, you can considerably cut down the amount of toxins you cons
775
2012-14-24
 

The information presented on this website is not intended as specific medical advice and is not a substitute for professional medical treatment or diagnosis. Read Newsmax Terms and Conditions of Service.

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved