Tags: Trump | inflation | Fed | QE

Trump: Fed Stimulus Tools Will Stoke Inflationary Pressures

Tuesday, 18 Sep 2012 09:50 AM

The Federal Reserve’s decision to jolt the economy with monetary stimulus tools will pump up inflationary pressures down the road, said billionaire real estate mogul Donald Trump.

The Fed recently announced it will buy $40 billion a month in mortgage-backed securities from banks to pump liquidity into the financial system in a way that pushes down interest rates across the broader economy to spur recovery, a monetary policy tool known as quantitative easing.

Side effects to such a policy tool — branded by many as printing money out of thin air — include a weaker dollar, rising stock and commodity prices and mounting inflationary pressures.

Editor's Note: Obama Donor Banned This Video But You Can Watch it Here

Economists have said the move likely reflects sentiment among Federal Reserve board members that creating jobs takes priority over keeping inflation rates as close to target levels as possible, though sooner or later, consumer prices will rise.

“Everything is artificial, there’s nothing that’s real. We’re printing money and we’re doing it incorrectly,” Trump told CNBC.

“[U]ltimately it will come home to roost and it’s going to be very, very unfortunate in the form of interest rates and really some very severe things happening later on with the economy,” Trump said.

The Fed has said conditions meriting rock-bottom interest rates will likely stick around through mid-2015.

Inflation, meanwhile, might benefit wealthy real-estate owners and those who control other hard assets, but not the broader economy, Trump added.

“As a real estate person, inflation is my friend, inflation is a great, great friend to those of us at a certain level of real estate. It’s been great over the years,” Trump said.

“I’ve loved inflation, but I don’t like it for the country. But as an individual, inflation has always been, you know, it’s made me very rich.”

The Fed’s decision to roll out quantitative easing to spur recovery marks the third time the U.S. central bank has resorted to the monetary stimulus tool since the 2008 financial crisis.

Two previous rounds saw the Fed buy a combined $2.3 trillion in assets from banks in the last four years.

A recent Rasmussen Reports survey finds most Americans agree with Trump that inflationary pressures could soon begin building.

A Rasmussen Reports survey found that 37 percent of American adults are at least somewhat confident that the Fed can keep inflation under control and interest rates down, with just 11 percent are very confident.

However, 58 percent said they lacked confidence in the Fed to keep inflation rates in check, with 15 percent saying they were not at all confident.

“Prior to this year, confidence in the Fed was mainly in the high 30s since July 2009. Optimism inched up slightly in December 2011 and has hovered around 40 percent since then,” the Rasmussen Reports survey found.

“But confidence dipped back down below 40 percent for the first time two months ago and has yet to climb back.”

Editor's Note: Obama Donor Banned This Video But You Can Watch it Here

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The Federal Reserve’s decision to jolt the economy with monetary stimulus tools will pump up inflationary pressures down the road, said billionaire real estate mogul Donald Trump.
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2012-50-18
Tuesday, 18 Sep 2012 09:50 AM
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