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Students Threatened for Wearing US Colors on Cinco de Mayo

By Lowell Ponte   |   Thursday, 06 May 2010 03:23 PM

On May 5, Cinco de Mayo, five students at Live Oak High School near San Francisco were threatened with suspension for wearing the colors and patterns of the American flag.

What they wore could start a fight, assistant principal Miguel Rodriguez told the young men. He ordered them to go home and change their clothes.

When the students objected, Rodriguez and principal Nick Boden told them they could wear American colors on any other day but said, according to student Daniel Galli, "today is sensitive to Mexican-Americans because it's supposed to be their holiday, so we were not allowed to wear it today."

"I think they should apologize cause it is a Mexican Heritage Day," student Annicia Nunez told the local NBC station as the issue grew. "We don't deserve to get disrespected like that. We wouldn't do that on Fourth of July."

Disrespected? Would a patriotic Irish-American feel "disrespected" by fellow Americans wearing the colors of the Stars and Stripes?

On Cinco de Mayo, the school had instituted a day of Mexican celebration, paying a group of professional baile folklorico dancers to perform Mexican music and wave red, white, and green Mexican flags on campus.

As this controversy rippled into national news, famed film critic Roger Ebert tweeted, "Kids who wear American Flag t-shirts on 5 May should have to share a lunchroom table with those who wear a hammer and sickle on 4 July."

Do liberals like Mr. Ebert see American patriotism as merely a fashion statement, a whim with no more value than Marxist symbols that represent the overthrow of freedom?

Who was being intolerant at this taxpayer-funded public school? The kids wearing red, white and blue did nothing whatever to express anti-Mexican views.

The only intolerance seen here was in the eyes of a Hispanic vice principal, who feared violence from brainwashed Mexican-American students . . . and who therefore ordered law-abiding Americans — not the 100 students wearing red, white and green — to remove their colors.

Mr. Rodriguez should be fired.

Last time I checked, California was still part of the United States, not Mexico, although radical organizations like MEChA are working for the reconquest of the Southwest, "stolen by gringos," by an invasion of immigrants from the land that briefly ruled here prior to 1848, Mexico. (Prior to Mexico's 1820 Revolution, California had been governed by Spain — and half its Spaniard Californios greeted John C. Fremont and American forces during the Mexican-American War as liberators from Mexican oppression.)

"All they were doing was displaying their patriotism," said the mother of one of the five young men, Dominic Maciel, whom she described as "half Hispanic."

"They're expressing their individuality," she continued. And this is key, because today's politically correct leftist politics of racial sensitivity is collectivist.

It aims to force everyone to think of himself or herself as a member of a group, preferably a victim group that wears its own colors and sees itself in conflict with traditional, individualistic America.

Suppose this school had taught authentic history.

All students would have learned of the heroic victory over French troops by a Mexican army at the Battle of Puebla on Cinco de Mayo, 1862, the only military victory over a foreign invader in Mexican history.

They would also have learned that the French soon thereafter returned, defeated the Mexicans, and established French rule in Mexico City.

And they would have learned who truly liberated Mexico.

France had occupied Mexico beginning in 1862 while America was distracted by war. In 1866, with the War Between the States over, an American army was in Texas near the Mexican border.

The U.S. notified France that, as a European nation trying to colonize a Latin American country, it was in violation of our Monroe Doctrine.

If France did not leave Mexico pronto, we warned, it would have to contend not only with Mexican peasant pitchforks but also with battle-hardened, heavily armed American troops.

Faced with this choice, France's Napoleon III withdrew in 1867 and left his installed hapless Hapsburg Emperor Maximilan to his fate before a Mexican firing squad.

That's right, boys and girls. The United States liberated Mexico from France.

And wearing the flag of Mexico's liberator from France, the United States, should therefore be seen on Cinco de Mayo as a pro-Mexican, pro-freedom gesture that any educated Mexican or Mexican-American would applaud.

Instead, in San Diego schools many classrooms reportedly no longer say the morning Pledge of Allegiance because it evokes hostile reactions from the large number of illegal aliens in those classrooms.

These Mexican students are receiving a very liberal collectivist education paid for by American taxpayers whose ancestors came from every land, including Mexico (where no such generosity or rights are granted to its illegal aliens).

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On May 5, Cinco de Mayo, five students at Live Oak High School near San Francisco were threatened with suspension for wearing the colors and patterns of the American flag. What they wore could start a fight, assistant principal Miguel Rodriguez told the young men. He...
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