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FT: Investors Downplay US Corporate Debt Binge Risks

Image: FT: Investors Downplay US Corporate Debt Binge Risks
(Eduardo Huelin/Dreamstime)

By    |   Tuesday, 23 May 2017 12:20 PM

Investors reportedly are flocking to buy tens of billions of new bond offerings from U.S. companies despite a warning by the International Monetary Fund over their debt binge.

“A quickening in global economic activity and improving earnings for companies during the first quarter has helped moderate concerns about excess leverage,” the Financial Times reported.

Monica Erickson, a portfolio manager with asset manager DoubleLine Capital, told the FT that for many investors “leverage is less of a concern with earnings growth.”

“Outstanding U.S. corporate debt has swelled more than 275 percent over the past two decades to $8.5 trillion, with credit ratings broadly deteriorating over that period. In 1996, roughly two-thirds of groups rated by S&P Global held an investment-grade rating. That has fallen to less than 45 percent today, alongside the surge in the junk debt industry,” the FT reported.

U.S. corporate-bond sales are at the second-fastest pace on record, with more than $750 billion raised through debt capital markets so far, the FT cited Dealogic data.

Meanwhile, the IMF also recently warned that U.S. President Donald Trump's proposed tax cuts and roll-back of financial regulations could spark a new round of financial risk-taking of the type that preceded the last crisis in 2008, Reuters reported.

The IMF said in its semi-annual Global Financial Stability Report that risks to stability have generally diminished in the last six months amid stronger global economic growth and higher interest rates that have improved bank earnings.

But it said that already highly leveraged U.S. companies may not be in a position to translate a cash-flow boost from U.S. Republican tax reform proposals into productive capital investments that can aid sustainable growth.

Instead, the Fund said the slug of cash, which is likely to include repatriation of profits held overseas by multinational corporations, could be channeled into risks such as purchases of financial assets, mergers and dividend payouts. Such temptations would be highest in the information technology and health care sectors, according to the report.

"Cash flow from tax reforms may accrue mainly to sectors that have engaged in substantial financial risk taking," the IMF said. "Such risk taking is associated with intermittent large destabilizing swings in the financial system over the past few decades."

The report noted that past major tax changes typically were followed by increases in financial risk-taking, including the tax reforms in 1986 and a corporate tax repatriation "holiday" in 2004. In both cases, these led to leverage buildups that were followed by recessions, in 1990 and 2008.

If the U.S. labor market turns out to have little slack left to absorb the stimulus from Trump's proposed tax cuts and spending plans, inflation and interest rates could rise more sharply than expected. This could increase market volatility and raise debt service costs for already-stretched corporate balance sheets, the IMF said.

It added that a shift toward protectionism in the United States and other advanced countries also could reduce trade and capital flows, reducing growth and dampening market sentiment.

"Tighter financial conditions could lead to distress" for weaker firms, the IMF said, noting that resulting losses would be borne by banks, life insurers, mutual funds, pension funds, and overseas institutions.

(Newsmax wires services contributed to this report).

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Investors reportedly are flocking to buy tens of billions of new bond offerings from U.S. companies despite a warning by the International Monetary Fund over their debt binge.
Investors, Corporate, Debt, Binge
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2017-20-23
Tuesday, 23 May 2017 12:20 PM
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