Tags: customer | service | centers | disney

The Rising Prestige of Branded Customer Service Centers

Image: The Rising Prestige of Branded Customer Service Centers

By    |   Monday, 04 Jul 2016 06:31 AM

Ben Rogers originally planned to study business at a university. Instead, the 20-something year-old reportedly applied to work at the coffee chain Pret a Manger after having seen an advertisement for Pret’s apprentice school on a website.

Rogers is among an increasing number of workers who are gaining training without going to business school.

“On the job experience is the best training anyone can get,” says Diya Obeid, founder of JobDiva, an applicant tracking system.

In addition to business schools at established universities, the development of customer service is being perfected at knowledge centers created by companies dedicated to its study, such as Zappos University, Pret Academy and the Disney Institute.

“Disney knows that if you enhance customer experience in a fun and sociable way, it creates clients for life,” said Mike Sciortino, founder and CEO of Gratitude Marketing.

Founded in 1923, the Disney Picture Company is now training the employees of other companies in the Disney Approach to Quality Service.

For some $1,300, managers and employees learn Disney commandments, such as how to differentiate customer service in order to become a provider of choice, using tools to gauge the needs, wants, stereotypes and emotions of customers at an individual level and how to design quality service standards to create a consistent service experience. Standard pricing for multiple days starts at $4,900, according to the Disney Institute’s website.

These niche training programs essentially teach the same principles of customer service whether it’s for credit towards a master’s degree or training for a specific job at a particular company.

For example, Zappos University, also known as Zappos Insights, includes curriculum such as the Wow School and 3 Day Culture Camp.

“Everybody goes through our 4 week new hire training process and groups of classes are mixed so that different levels of employees co-mingle during the courses,” said Rob Siefker, director of the customer loyalty team with Zappos.

One way that the University of Georgia Business School is maintaining its relevance is by presenting multiple case studies of customer service from various companies to their students.

“We look at the best practices of companies that are successful with customer service and teach them back to our students who don’t have access to the Disney Institute and the Zappos school,” said Sundar Bharadwaj, the Coca-Cola Company’s chair of marketing at the University of Georgia. “We give business students a broader education of customer service, which is an overall view and we discuss successes and failures.”

Although branded knowledge centers may be giving university based business schools a run for their money, training is not viewed as an alternative for education at least not by recruiters and human resource professionals.

“We think of training as the exercise of gaining skill and knowledge in business processes and tools,” Obeid told Newsmax Finance. “We think of education as acquiring capabilities to learn concepts.”

Juliette Fairley is an author, lecturer and TV host based in New York. To read more of her work, Click Here Now.


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Ben Rogers originally planned to study business at a university. Instead, the 20-something year-old reportedly applied to work at the coffee chain Pret a Manger after having seen an advertisement for Pret's apprentice school on a website.
customer, service, centers, disney
499
2016-31-04
Monday, 04 Jul 2016 06:31 AM
Newsmax Inc.
 

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