Tags: IRS | Congress | taxpayers | fund

A Well-Fed Junkyard Dog Is Less Dangerous Than a Hungry One Is

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Monday, 05 May 2014 07:55 AM Current | Bio | Archive

The Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration testified last week before the House and Senate explaining why the IRS needs more money.

For the fiscal year 2015, the budget request to fund the IRS is now $12.5 billion, an increase of $1.2 billion from the 2014 budget of $11.3 billion.

The respective Congressional committees were told that the request supports the Treasury's Strategic Plan and the agency's priority goal of focusing on expanding the availability and improving the quality of customer service options.

Given what seems to be the quality of existing customer service by the IRS, I thought the amount of the requested increase was decidedly conservative. I would think that $25 billion would be more appropriate considering all that the IRS is required to do by Congress and the president.

I know this seems a bit bewildering, but expecting any government agency to administer a complex tax law that is, by any fair measure, unintelligible and hated is a daunting proposition. It is Congress that establishes tax policy and the law. The IRS is stuck in the middle, victimized actually, just like the taxpayers.

No, I am not excusing the excess and abusive actions of which the IRS stands accused. There are plenty of taxpayer advocate and governmental reports going back for years (decades actually) that detail in excruciating detail the flaws and failures of the IRS.

Beating up on the IRS is easy, since it has the unfortunate responsibility of taking money from people who feel they are being robbed, or worse, by the government. History tells us that all governments that used an income tax system to fund its operations exploited and mistreated its taxpayers.

I don't think you should be surprised that tax history is just repeating itself.

But, Congress and the president are not particularly concerned by what is good for the taxpayers. Their concern consists of doing whatever needs to be done to get re-elected. Political survival is all they exist for.

Repealing the income tax law is the only solution to this dilemma. Any replacement system should be based on a simple fact — the government likes to be paid its taxes in cash so the tax system should be based on cash.

Until the time comes when the taxpayers are so revolted by their political leadership that they refuse to re-elect them, it would be better to at least have the IRS properly funded and manned. A well-fed junkyard dog is a lot less dangerous than a hungry one is.

Congress and the president are responsible for the quality of the services the bureaucrats provide to the taxpayers. If they want the IRS to do the job as ordered, they ought to at least budget enough money so that the IRS is a little less miserable to the taxpayers.

No doubt, the customers of the IRS would appreciate that.

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The Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration testified last week before the House and Senate explaining why the IRS needs more money.
IRS, Congress, taxpayers, fund
477
2014-55-05
Monday, 05 May 2014 07:55 AM
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