Tags: Gun Control | Virginia | hunting | landowners

Hunting in Virginia: 4 Things for Landowners to Know About Hunting on Private Property

By    |   Friday, 05 Jun 2015 11:35 PM

According to the Virginia Department of Forestry, 66 percent of the state's land is privately owned. Hunters often seek permission from landowners to hunt on private property, in an effort to reach areas otherwise untouchable to them.

For property owners, here are four things they should know about opening their private property to hunters, according to the Virginia Department of Game and Fisheries.

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1. Liability
Landowners are not liable for injuries or damages that occur on their property as long as they have not charged a fee to hunt or have been malicious in failure to warn the hunter about a dangerous concern on the property. Virginia passed a law in 1982 to protect private property owners who open their lands to recreational users and to encourage cooperative relationships between hunters and landowners.

If liability is still a concern, landowners can purchase a policy for protection and pass part of the fee on to the hunters, but they cannot profit from hunting. If landowners do not want to take the liability concern on, they can temporarily lease their land to hunting parties. They can also require the hunting parties to carry their own insurance and provide proof prior to allowing any hunting to take place on the private property.

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2. Hunting Invasive Species on Private Land
Feral hogs are considered an invasive species in Virginia. With that in mind, there is no closed season for feral hogs on private land. Hunters must have a valid hunting license, but are not subjected to any bag limits on hogs.

3. Permission
Hunters must have the permission of the property owner to hunt or even track injured game on private property in Virginia. Landowners must give written permission to hunters who will be hunting on their property. If a hunter is found guilty of trespassing on private property, they can be charged with an unlawful hunt and fined.

4. Benefits
Landowners who hunting on their lands often form beneficial relationships with hunters. The benefits include habitat improvement, safety and security. To find responsible hunters, landowners are advised to contact local hunt clubs or 4-H operations.

This article is for information only. Please check current regulations before hunting.

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According to the Virginia Department of Forestry, 66 percent of the state's land is privately owned. Hunters often seek permission from landowners to hunt on private property, in an effort to reach areas otherwise untouchable to them.
Virginia, hunting, landowners
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2015-35-05
Friday, 05 Jun 2015 11:35 PM
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