Tags: Gun Control | Vermont | hunting | invasive species

Hunting in Vermont: 3 Invasive Species to Vermont and Its Rules for Hunting Them

By    |   Thursday, 04 Jun 2015 05:23 PM

Hunting in Vermont offers opportunities to help control the state's invasive species. Some Vermont invasive species are also considered nuisance animals throughout America, like wild pigs and starlings, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Here are three invasive species found in the state to be aware of when hunting in Vermont.

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1. Wild Boar
These feral pigs are resilient and breed year-round, so their populations can spike quickly if they are not managed or eradicated. Their natural tendencies to burrow and insatiable appetites can cause financial burden for farmers and landowners.

Although they have not been reported in large masses in the state, the Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department is keeping a close eye on the species, according to the Brattleboro Reformer. Nationwide, the species causes damages amounting to about $1.5 billion annually, destroying as much as 1,000 acres per hour, the newspaper reported. In 2014, a national study began to help assess the wild pig situation in Vermont.

Because feral pigs are not protected in the state, anyone with a valid hunting license in Vermont can take a feral pig.

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2. Mute Swan
The population of mute swans along the Atlantic Flyway has doubled every year since 1987, according to the Sentinel Source. In Vermont, these swans are considered such a problem that wildlife officials are encouraged to take advantage of the state’s shoot-to-kill policy, allowing officials to eradicate the birds. These invasive birds are a nuisance to waterfowl in the state, destroying nests and competing for food.

3. Alewives
These fish were introduced in Lake St. Catherine and have also been found in Lake Champlain. Their presence negatively affects other fish populations such as salmon and trout, which therefore also impacts Vermont fishery businesses. However, this fish poses a challenge to fishermen as they feed on drifting zooplankton, making them difficult to hook, according to the Burlington Free Press.

This article is for information only. Please check current regulations before hunting.

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Hunting in Vermont offers opportunities to help control the state's invasive species. Some Vermont invasive species are also considered nuisance animals throughout America, like wild pigs and starlings, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
Vermont, hunting, invasive species
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2015-23-04
Thursday, 04 Jun 2015 05:23 PM
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