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8 Deadly Diseases Capable of Making a Comeback Without Vaccines

Image: 8 Deadly Diseases Capable of Making a Comeback Without Vaccines
Human Diphtheria, illustration. (Alejandro Dans/Dollarphotoclub)

By    |   Wednesday, 11 Mar 2015 03:43 PM

Generations have passed since the world experienced a deadly epidemic and it's in part due to vaccines. However, a decrease in vaccination rates, as well as the struggle to immunize certain populations around the world could reawaken some of the world's deadliest diseases.

Here are eight examples of deadly diseases that could make a comeback without the protection of vaccines:

1. Diphtheria, a bacterial throat infection, causes breathing difficulty, paralysis, heart failure and death. Some people consider it a disease that has been eliminated throughout the developed world. Failure to get the necessary vaccination when exposed has resulted in the illness.

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2. Measles, along with mumps and rubella, caused millions to suffer high fevers, viral meningitis, miscarriages and death until the MMR vaccine for all three diseases was developed in the 1960s. However, a 1997 study linked the vaccine to autism, leaving some parents in panic. The study was later discredited, as other studies assured the safety of the vaccine. These diseases are now increasing.

3. Polio peaked in the 1950s, paralyzing or killing half a million people a year. With the development of the polio vaccine, a world free from the disease became possible. Misinformation in Africa that the vaccine caused infertility and a refusal by some to accept the vaccine for religious reasons has contributed to increasing cases.

4. Tuberculosis, a deadly lung disease, had been controlled because of vaccinations, but it is making a comeback. A new drug-resistant form has developed to infect and kill thousands of people a year.

5. Pneumococcal disease, a bacterial infection, ranges from mild to extremely dangerous. Symptoms include fever, chills, difficulty breathing and chest pain. Severe bacterial strains cause pneumococcal meningitis, blood infections and sepsis. Although a vaccine is available, incidents are increasing.

URGENT: Should the Government Be Allowed to Mandate Vaccinations?

6. Hepatitis A and B infections occur through exposure to contaminated bodily fluids, food or water. They cause liver disease that results in fever, loss of appetite, stomach pain, fatigue, vomiting and jaundice. Infected victims may not show symptoms. Failure to get a vaccination could result in death.

7. Rotavirus is the most common cause of diarrhea in infants and children worldwide, says the Mayo Clinic. Cases are usually mild and treatable in developed countries and vaccinations can help with prevention, but the disease can lead to death when public services break down and vaccinations aren't used.

8. Pertussis, or whooping cough, causes uncontrollable coughing. Although a vaccine is available, incidents have been increasing. Some parents refuse the vaccinations for their children, creating more opportunities for infection in others.

This article is for information only and is not intended as medical advice. Talk with your doctor about your specific health and medical needs.

VOTE NOW: Should Vaccinations for Children Be the Parents' Decision?

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Generations have passed since the world experienced a deadly epidemic and it's in part due to vaccines. However, a decrease in vaccination rates, as well as the struggle to immunize certain populations around the world could reawaken some of the world's deadliest diseases.
Vaccines, Disease, Health, Measles
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2015-43-11
Wednesday, 11 Mar 2015 03:43 PM
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