Tags: Pets | special needs dog | pets | adoption | pet | problems

Special Needs Dog Adoption: Why You Should Consider a Little-Bit-Different Pet

By    |   Tuesday, 06 Jan 2015 04:51 PM

When people decide to add a dog to the family they often turn to breeders in their search for a perfect canine, but a special-needs dog can offer just as much, if not more, unconditional love, loyalty, and canine companionship to its owner.

"There is a tremendous rescue movement for people considering a dog or puppy,"  professional dog trainer Sarah Hodgson says in her blog on Huffington Post. "There are over 6 million dogs euthanized in the United States yearly, which is about 100 times the amount of attendees at the Super Bowl."

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Reputable dog breeders take great pride in breeding for quality and in the care that they provide to their animals. However, many of the cute little puppies in pet stores are the product of inhumane puppy breeding mills that churn out pups for profit with little regard for their health and well-being.

According to the ASPCA, many pet stores buy from puppy mills using the services of a middleman. However, "The lineage records of puppy mill dogs are often falsified. Other puppy mill puppies are sold directly to the public, including over the Internet, through newspaper ads, and at swap meets and flea markets," the association states.

Choosing to adopt a special needs dog, whether a rescue or a dog with medical issues, can be extremely rewarding. This life-saving decision not only helps the dog, but it can also act as a teachable moment for families with children about what it means to give as well as to receive.

Adopting rather than purchasing a dog allows families or individuals who do not have the time to go through the puppy phase the option to adopt an older dog who is already housebroken and has some basic training.

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While there is no guarantee a rescue dog will not have some behavioral issues, taking time during the adoption process to get to know the dog, as well as the shelter's profiling of the dog's behavior, can assist in creating the right match between owner and canine.

Some special-needs dogs have true physical disabilities. There are organizations that, rather than euthanize them, rehabilitate them and offer the dogs up for adoption. The stories about these dogs, some of which were born with physical malformations or suffered blindness, deafness, and illness from abuse at the hands of their owners, are heartbreaking.

These special-needs dogs offer people the unique opportunity to make a real difference in the quality of a dog's life — especially because they are often the last to be adopted if they are adopted at all.

Adopting, loving, and caring for a dog that is just a little bit different has its own set of rewards. According to Joyce Darrell and Michael Dickerson, founders of Pets With Disabilities, "Disabled animals show a special kind of devoted loyalty to their caregivers, so if you have room in home and in your heart, adopt a disabled animal. It just might be the best pet you will ever have."

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When people decide to add a dog to the family they often turn to breeders in their search for a perfect canine, but a special needs dog can offer just as much, if not more, unconditional love, loyalty, and canine companionship to its owner.
special needs dog, pets, adoption, pet, problems
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2015-51-06
Tuesday, 06 Jan 2015 04:51 PM
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