Tags: Gun Control | smart guns | gunmakers | failed | market

4 Gunmakers That Have Tried and Failed to Bring Smart Guns to Market

By    |   Wednesday, 03 Jun 2015 10:07 AM

It may come as a surprise to learn that the idea of smart gun technology is not a new concept, the earliest one, dating back to 1975. Since that time, a few gun makers and typically anti-gun proponents have tried and failed to bring smart gun technology to market.

Gun proponents, constitutionalists and those true to our country’s values and traditions simply aren’t interested in any further restrictions on America’s Second Amendment right.

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Even so, occasionally, a gun maker will still try to appease smart gun proponents by attempting to come out with a “newer, safer firearm” and market it as a smart gun.

In 1975, Magna-Trigger inventer, Joe Davis designed a system for certain models of revolvers manufactured by Smith and Wesson. The user wears a magnetic ring that allows the complete pull of the trigger and firing the gun.

If someone other than the ring wearer attempted to fire the gun, the idea was that the trigger would lock and could not be pulled. While this product is still available, the concept never really gained popularity, according to Guns Saves Lives.

Jonathon Mossburg, CEO of iGun Technology Corporation is working on developing a similar system to the Magna-Trigger, in which the owner wears a magnetic ring to pull the trigger, reports Business Insider.

It is unlikely that this product will be popular among shotgun owners for the same reasons that Magna-Trigger never took off for handguns.

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In 1996, Colt developed a smart gun system in which the wearer of a smart watch would be the only one capable of firing the corresponding gun. The project was eventually abandoned when concerns about battery failure arose, according to the Hartford Courant.

Lastly, a German company, Armatix, has developed a safety system not unlike the one abandoned by Colt. This system requires the owner to wear an RFID chip imbedded in a smart watch that corresponds to the firearm.

Already, American gun owners are expressing their displeasure at further gun restrictions. A California store recently decided not to sell the Armatix iP1 after facing backlash on forums and their social media page that hurt their bottom line, reports Fox News.

Since the 1970’s smart gun technology has failed to become a booming business. The American gun owner wants nothing to do with it, as it is seen as yet further infringement on Second Amendment rights to many.

This article does not constitute legal advice. Check the current gun laws before purchasing or traveling with a firearm.

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It may come as a surprise to learn that the idea of smart gun technology is not a new concept, the earliest one, dating back to 1975. Since that time, a few gun makers and typically anti-gun proponents have tried and failed to bring smart gun technology to market.
smart guns, gunmakers, failed, market
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2015-07-03
Wednesday, 03 Jun 2015 10:07 AM
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