Tags: Gun Control | Rhode Island | hunting | invasive

Hunting in Rhode Island: 4 Invasive Species to Rhode Island and Its Rules for Hunting Them

By    |   Friday, 29 May 2015 10:23 PM

The Rhode Island Invasive Species Council defines an invasive species as one that is not native to the area and that poses a threat to public health or to the economy or environment. Hunting laws in Rhode Island allow you to hunt many of these species with minimal restrictions.

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Several plant, animal and insect species in Rhode Island fall into this category, with some introduced by European settlers and others making their way to the state in recent decade, according to the Rhode Island Invasive Species Council. All are considered a nuisance in some way, with hunting laws more lax than for other species.

When hunting in Rhode Island, abide by the state’s laws regarding the taking or killing of the following invasive species:

Monk Parakeet
The monk parakeet moved into Rhode Island in 1973. It is considered an “invasive exotic” and is not protected by the federal government, according to the website Quahog.com. The bird quickly became a nuisance, disturbing residents with its noise and building large nests that sometimes cause power outages. There is no closed season on the monk parakeet, as noted in the Department of Environmental Management’s hunting regulations. That means you’re free to hunt the bird year-round as long as you abide by the same state hunting laws as for hunting other game.

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Rock Dove
The University of Rhode Island lists the rock dove, also known as a wild pigeon, as one of several invasive species in the state. According to the Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management’s Hunting Regulations you can hunt the rock dove year round exept in the John L. Curran State Park/Management Area.

Sparrows and Starlings
The University of Rhode Island considers house sparrows and European starlings invasive species. According to the Audubon Society of Rhode Island, neither house sparrows nor starlings are protected by state or federal law, which makes it legal to kill them. However, Rhode Island limits when you can hunt them. On Prudence Island, for example, you only hunt sparrows and starlings during November. While you can hunt both birds at the state’s public hunting areas, at some there is no open season on either bird.

This article is for information only. Please check current regulations before hunting.

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The Rhode Island Invasive Species Council defines an invasive species as one that is not native to the area and that poses a threat to public health or to the economy or environment. Hunting laws in Rhode Island allow you to hunt many of these species with minimal restrictions.
Rhode Island, hunting, invasive
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2015-23-29
Friday, 29 May 2015 10:23 PM
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