Tags: Retirement | retirement | Missouri | drawbacks

Drawbacks to Retiring in Missouri

By    |   Monday, 08 Jun 2015 12:40 PM

Missouri ranks toward the middle – neither the worst nor the best – when it comes to geography, demographics and its suitability for retirees. What might be a plus for one person is a minus for another. Here are some drawbacks to keep in mind when considering retiring in the Show Me State.

Free Retirement Calculator: When Can You Retire? —
Click Here to Find Out

  1. Unpredictable Weather - Cool air from the northern plains collides with hot, humid air from the Gulf of Mexico and the result is a cacophonous spring and summer for Missouri. Thunderstorms are common and tornadoes are familiar, and temperature swings are an everyday thing.
  2. High Crime Rate - Most of the state is peaceful and rural, but major cities such as St. Louis and Kansas City skew the crime rate upward. Indeed, Bankrate ranks Missouri 37th in the nation as far as low crime rates. Nonetheless, things were improving even in St. Louis, CNNMoney said in 2013, before the rioting in Ferguson in the wake of Michael Brown's shooting by a police officer. Although the city saw 35 murders per 100,000 people, the third-highest homicide rate of any major city, the numbers didn't tell the whole story, the website said, citing St. Louis's inability to grow beyond its boundaries because it's "landlocked" by suburbs. Across the state, Kansas City, Missouri, had the nation's ninth-highest crime rate and seventh-highest murder rate in 2013, CNNMoney said.
  3. How Soon Can You Retire? Free Test Shows You When — Click Here

  4. Drug Problems - Outside the urban areas, the largely rural problem of methamphetamine manufacture and use has taken hold in Missouri, although the St. Louis Post Dispatch reported in 2014 that the state is no longer the leading producer of meth. A drop in meth lab raids and arrests in 2014 was attributable to a focus on larger labs more than the "home" labs that were the previous target of law enforcement, the paper said. Additionally, law enforcement was tightening the screws on the sale of the legal medications used to make meth. However, a "purer" form of the drug is being smuggled in from Mexico, the paper said.
  5. Taxes Can Be Confusing - Missouri's neither the best nor the worst when it comes to tax rates on retirees, although what's taxed and what isn't can be confusing. For example, the state has sales or use taxes on the sale and use of some items that other states don't tax, such as food. Prescription drugs, though, are not taxed, according to the Retirement Living Information Center. The state's revenue department says the basic sales tax rate is 4.225 percent, though counties can add on additional taxes. In some counties, the tax rate went as high as 7.465 percent in 2014.
An Extremely Simple Way to Determine If You're Ready to Retire — Find Out Now

© 2017 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

 
1Like our page
2Share
FastFeatures
Missouri ranks toward the middle - neither the worst nor the best - when it comes to geography, demographics and its suitability for retirees. What might be a plus for one person is a minus for another.
retirement, Missouri, drawbacks
475
2015-40-08
Monday, 08 Jun 2015 12:40 PM
Newsmax Inc.
 

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved